Philip Green Injunction: is anonymity for celebrities really worth the potential backlash? – Ashley Hurst and Alex Vakil

4 11 2018

The disclosure by Lord Hain in Parliament that Sir Philip Green was the individual who had obtained an anonymous privacy injunction against the Telegraph has once again cast doubt on the effectiveness of such injunctions against the press. Read the rest of this entry »





Why Lord Hain was wrong to disclose Sir Philip Green’s name – Tom Double

29 10 2018

Lord Hain’s decision to name Sir Philip Green in the House of Lords as the individual who obtained an interim-injunction against the Daily Telegraph has polarised opinion.  Read the rest of this entry »





Lord Hain and Privilege: When power, wealth and abuse combine to subvert the rule of law – Paul Wragg

27 10 2018

Judges have their role to play, and Parliamentarians theirs, and “it is for the public to judge whether what I have done is right or wrong”, says Lord Peter Hain.  Yet since Lord Hain chose to breach the court injunction issued by the Court of Appeal in ABC v Telegraph Group plc by hiding behind Parliamentary privilege, this is exactly what the public does not get to do.  Read the rest of this entry »





Libel Injunctions: Time to revisit the rule in Bonnard v Perryman? – Helena Shipman

8 08 2018

The interim defamation injunction has long been considered a rare breed; indeed it has been 127 years since the common law rule in Bonnard v Perryman [1891] 2 Ch 269 was first established, preventing claimants from obtaining interim libel injunctions in all but the most exceptional circumstances. Read the rest of this entry »





Case: XKF v BBC, Former police officer granted injunction to restrain broadcast of interview highlighting criminal past – Tom Dane

12 06 2018

In XKF v BBC former police officer applied for relief restraining the broadcast by the respondent BBC of an interview of him recorded near his home. Read the rest of this entry »





“Persons Unknown Cases”: some recent issues – Adam Speker

8 06 2018

In media and communications litigation, one party name has become increasingly common. Not News Group or Associated or even Google. It is the party known as Person or Persons Unknown. Read the rest of this entry »





Google “Thumbs its Nose” at New Zealand’s Courts: Kiwis Should Look to Canada for a Precedent – Hugh Stephens

6 06 2018

Google is at it again. According to press reports in the New Zealand Herald, Google refused to comply with a New Zealand court order to suppress details and remove content related to a local murder trial because, according to a representative of Google NZ, “Google LLC, was a separate legal entity incorporated in the US, meaning New Zealand’s courts and laws held no power over it.” Tell that to the Supreme Court of Canada. Read the rest of this entry »