More #Trolls and #Trolling: the last three months of online abuse – Clare Brown

30 09 2014

cyber-bullyThis time last year I reported that summer 2013 had seen an explosion of online abuse. From TV academics, politicians, journalists, campaigners to troubled teenagers, certain individuals (and groups of individuals) were using social media to target vulnerable people. This summer has felt less dramatic on a day to day basis but I thought it would be helpful to review the past three months. Read the rest of this entry »





Defamation Act 2013, Serious Harm and the Cooke costs ruling – Oliver Fetiveau

30 09 2014

Mr-Justice-BeanOn 13 August 2014 Mr Justice Bean handed down his judgment in the case of Cooke v MGN ([2014] EWHC 2831 (QB)).  This was the first case in which the requirement for ‘serious harm’, as newly prescribed by the Defamation Act 2013 (the “2013 Act”), was considered. Read the rest of this entry »





Is this the best human rights correction ever or the worst? – Adam Wagner

29 09 2014

screen-shot-2014-09-29-at-13-11-53Even by the usual brazen standards of human rights reporting, this correction  which was published today by The Daily Mail stands out: Read the rest of this entry »





Inforrm: End of Summer Break

29 09 2014

The long Inforrm summer break ends today. Although we have had regular postings over the summer the new legal term begins on 1 October so we will be resuming regular weekly round ups and “term time” posting. Read the rest of this entry »





Brooks Newmark, Public Interest and the Editors’ Code – will IPSO act?

28 09 2014

Sunday MirrorOn Saturday 27 September 2014, Conservative MP and Minister for Civil Society Brooks Newmark was approached by the Sunday Mirror and was confronted with the fact that he had exchanged “X-rated photos” with an undercover reporter posing as a female party activist. Later the same day Mr Newmark announced that he was resigning from the Government and told the BBC he had been a “complete fool” and that he had “no-one to blame” but himself. Read the rest of this entry »





Dutch Google Spain ruling: More Freedom of Speech, Less Right To Be Forgotten For Criminals – Joran Spauwen and Jens van den Brink

27 09 2014

Google-logoLast week, the Court of Amsterdam in preliminary relief proceedings got a chance to shed light on the consequences of the much-discussed Google Spain (or Costeja) judgment of the Court of Justice EU in the Netherlands. As far as we are aware, this is the first time that a national court was asked to apply the Google Spain ruling. The proceedings in Amsterdam centred on one of the many ‘right to be forgotten’ requests Google received after the Google Spain judgment. Read the rest of this entry »





It came from CyberSpace: Defamation Law and the Internet – Judith Gibson

26 09 2014

gazetteIn an important new paper, the New South Wales District Court’s Defamation List Judge Judith Gibson looks at the case law on defamation and the internet, from both the plaintiff and defendant points of view.  The paper was given at the NSW State Legal Conference on Thursday 28 August 2014. Read the rest of this entry »





Trinity Mirror finally admits what we all knew, but will it change anything? – Brian Cathcart

25 09 2014

TrinityMirrorPerhaps the sleaziest aspect of Trinity Mirror’s phone hacking confession is the emphasis placed on the idea that the offences took place ‘many years ago’. For while it is true that we have had to wait years for confirmation that reporters at the company’s papers broke the law in this way, that delay was in large measure the fault of the company’s management. Read the rest of this entry »





News: Mirror Group admits liability in phone hacking cases

24 09 2014

Mirror GroupTrinity Mirror has announced that its subsidiary MGN Limited has admitted liability to four individuals who had sued over allegations of interception of voicemails.  MGN has apologised to those individuals and agreed to pay compensation.  It has also confirmed that six other voicemail interception claims have already been settled. Read the rest of this entry »





Hacked Off: IPSO launched with a whisper – Michelle Gribbon

24 09 2014

Moses-image-3Nearly two years after the Leveson Inquiry into press ethics which condemned the Press Complaints Commission, a “new” press regulator IPSO finally opened its doors on 8 September after months of delay. The Express Group, the Mirror Group, The Sun, The Times, The Sunday Times, the Mail Group and the Telegraph Group all signed up to their new creature, which promised to be ‘rigorous, independent, fair and transparent’ . Read the rest of this entry »