Law and Media Round Up, End of Summer Break – 30 September 2019

30 09 2019

The Michaelmas Term legal term begins on Tuesday 1 October 2019 and the (intermittent) Inforrm summer break comes to an end today.  This post includes significant developments over the previous few weeks, since our Law and Media Summer Round Up. Read the rest of this entry »





Disinfo Wars: a taxonomy of information warfare – Hossein Derakhshan

29 09 2019

In the Information Disorder report for Council of Europe (2017), Claire Wardle and I identified three types of bad-information (mis-, dis-, and malinformation), three phases (creation, (re)production, distribution), and three elements (agent, message, interpreter) to information disorder. Read the rest of this entry »





Regulating Facebook: a process, not an event – Leighton Andrews

28 09 2019

The Governor of the Bank of England, Mark Carney, recently flew half-way across the world to meet Mark Zuckerberg. While the Bank of England is being rather coy about what was discussed, a number of recent speeches by the Governor have raised questions about Facebook’s move into crypto-currency with its plans for its Libra system. Read the rest of this entry »





The Right To Be Forgotten back in the CJEU: Court Judgments on the territorial scope of de-referencing; and sensitive personal data – Ian Helme

27 09 2019

Following on from the Advocate General Opinions published on 10 January (which I wrote about here), yesterday the Court of Justice released its decisions in two cases concerning internet search engines and the right to be forgotten. Read the rest of this entry »





Ben Stokes, The Sun and the notion of responsible journalism – Peter Coe

26 09 2019

On 17 September 2019, The Sun published a story about the England cricketer Ben Stokes and his family. This featured on the front page of its print edition and is available online under the headline ‘STOKES’ SECRET TRAGEDY Ashes hero Ben Stokes’ brother and sister were killed by his mum’s jealous ex, three years before England star’s birth.Read the rest of this entry »





Users (and their bias) are key to fighting fake news on Facebook: AI isn’t smart enough yet – Gianluca Demartini

24 09 2019

The information we encounter online everyday can be misleading, incomplete or fabricated. Being exposed to “fake news” on social media platforms such as Facebook and Twitter can influence our thoughts and decisions. We’ve already seen misinformation interfere with elections in the United States. Read the rest of this entry »





Ben Stokes v The Sun: gross intrusion or simple reportage? How media privacy law works – Rebecca Moosavian

23 09 2019

When Ben Stokes celebrated his part in the England cricket team’s World Cup triumph, followed by his incredible match-winning innings during the Ashes, dubbed the “greatest ever”, he could not have anticipated that heightened interest in him would lead to the later unwelcome unearthing of an old family secret. Read the rest of this entry »





Ben Stokes, The Sun and Gareth Thomas: muckraking journalism with no regard for private lives

22 09 2019

The ‘silly season’ is supposed to be over and the most important constitutional case for many years is currently before the Supreme Court, but these matters did not stop The Sun from publishing on 17 September 2019 a grossly sensationalist and intrusive article about Ben Stokes, the England cricketer, and his family. Read the rest of this entry »





Case Law, South Africa: amaBhungane Centre v Minister of Justice, Landmark ruling impresses even ultimate whistle-blower Edward Snowden – Dario Milo

21 09 2019

The South African High Court judgment in the case of amaBhungane Centre for Investigative Journalism  v Minister of Justice and Correctional Services [2019] ZAGPPHC 384 is a victory for privacy rights. Read the rest of this entry »





United States: The legal basis of $170m fine on Google for YouTube’s infringement of children’s privacy – Eoin O’Dell

19 09 2019

The media was recently full of stories that Google had been “Fined $170 Million for Violating Children’s Privacy on YouTube” (that’s a headline from the New York Times; see also, for example, NPR | BBC | RTÉ | Silicon Republic). In this post, I want to sketch the legal background to, and consequences of, this fine; and, at the end, I will say a few words about the equivalent position in Europe. Read the rest of this entry »