Inforrm: End of 2017 Summer Break

30 09 2017

The long Inforrm summer break ends today. Although we have had regular postings over the summer the new legal term begins on Monday 2 October 2017 so we will be resuming regular weekly round ups and “term time” posting.   Read the rest of this entry »





Ireland: It’s time to abolish juries in defamation cases – Eoin O’Dell

29 09 2017

Libel cases in England and Wales are “better off without juries”, according to Sir Mark Warby, the High Court judge with responsibility for the Media and Communications List of the Queen’s Bench Division. Read the rest of this entry »





Why regulators like Ofcom are dropping the ball on ‘Fake News’, dark advertising and extremism – Leighton Andrews

28 09 2017

During the course of 2017, the large ‘big tech’ internet intermediaries have come under an unprecedented degree of scrutiny worldwide.  Facebook posts and Google search listings have come under fire as enablers of so-called ‘fake news’ and propaganda by extremist, terrorist and hate groups, with Facebook’s role in ‘dark advertising’ by hostile foreign powers particularly in the spotlight.  Read the rest of this entry »





Murdoch paper makes the case for Leveson Part 2 – Brian Cathcart

27 09 2017

Rupert Murdoch’s Sunday Times has got itself into a revealing tangle about Part Two of the Leveson Inquiry, accidentally demonstrating why the case for it is so strong even though company policy is to oppose it. Read the rest of this entry »





Law and Media, Summary Summer Round Up – 25 September 2017

25 09 2017

This is the last in our series of “Summary Round Ups” covering media and law developments during the Summer Legal Vacation. This covers matters since our Round Up of 11 September 2017. Read the rest of this entry »





Could Snapchat’s biggest selling point now be its downfall? – Rebecca Mardon

23 09 2017

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When Snapchat launched in 2011, ephemerality was its unique selling point. Its self-destructing photo and video messages were a stark departure from established social media platforms, which encouraged users to construct and populate content-laden profiles. Read the rest of this entry »





Australia: Whose interests? Why defining the ‘public interest’ is such a challenge – Jane Johnston

22 09 2017
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The “public interest” is a political concept that’s regularly trotted out along with other democratic principles such as transparency and accountability. And, like transparency and accountability, it’s difficult to pin down exactly what it means. Read the rest of this entry »





Beyond cats and Kardashians: can journalism satisfy audiences without dumbing down? – Peter Fray

19 09 2017

As the Federal government attempts to reform Australia’s media ownership laws, evidence is emerging that journalists are moving away from the traditional watchdog role of the press towards satisfying the demands of audiences. Read the rest of this entry »





Case Law, Australia: Wilson v Bauer Media Pty Ltd, Rebel Wilson awarded defamation damages of $4.5 million

18 09 2017

On 13 September 2017, Dixon J handed down judgment in the case of Wilson v Bauer Media Pty Ltd [2017] VSC 521.  He awarded Rebel Wilson a total of Aus$4,567,472 in defamation damages against Bauer Media Pty Ltd and Bauer Media Australia Pty Ltd (“Bauer Media”). Read the rest of this entry »





Can taking down websites really stop terrorists and hate groups? -Thomas Holt, Joshua D Freilich and Steven Chermak

17 09 2017

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In the wake of an explosion in London on September 15, President Trump called for cutting off extremists’ access to the internet. Racists and terrorists, and many other extremists, have used the internet for decades and adapted as technology evolved, shifting from text-only discussion forums to elaborate and interactive websites, custom-built secure messaging systems and even entire social media platforms. Read the rest of this entry »