Vacation Round Up – 27 May 2019

27 05 2019

The Easter legal term ended on Friday 24 May 2019.  The Trinity Legal Term begins on Tuesday 4 June 2019.  Inforrm is, therefore, taking a “mini-break” but this round up will cover some of the news of the past week. Read the rest of this entry »





Facebook doesn’t fool me: but I worry about how it affects you – Joseph B. Walther

25 05 2019

File 20190520 69204 1q7cp6p.jpg?ixlib=rb 1.1A number of prominent figures have called for some sort of regulation of Facebook – including one of the company’s co-founders and a venture capitalist who was one of Facebook’s early backers. Read the rest of this entry »





Case Law: R (Privacy International) v Investigatory Powers Tribunal, Parliament’s “ouster” of High Court judicial review powers is not binding – Omar Qureshi, Dan Tench and Cathryn Hopkins

23 05 2019

On 15 May 2019, the Supreme Court handed down its judgment in the case of R (on the application of Privacy International) v Investigatory Powers Tribunal ([2019] UKSC 22), deciding by a slim majority of 4:3 that an “ouster clause” in section 67(8) of the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000 (“RIPA”) that purports to exclude from challenge or appeal any decision of the Investigatory Powers Tribunal (“IPT”), does not prevent a judicial review challenge based on an error of law. Read the rest of this entry »





Reporting the Court of Protection: NB on Re NB – Barbara Rich

21 05 2019

At the beginning of April 2019, a Press Association report of an interim hearing at the Court of Protection provoked a number of newspaper headlines and outraged reactions, because it quoted a High Court judge, Mr Justice Hayden, as having spoken of a “fundamental human right” of a man to have sex with his wife.  Read the rest of this entry »





Law and Media Round Up – 20 May 2019

20 05 2019

On Friday 17 May 2019, the Court of Appeal (Lewison, McCombe and Haddon-Cave LJJ) handed down a judgment ([2019] EWCA Civ 852) which comprehensively reversed the decision of the first instance judge, Mr Justice Jay, given after a 7 day libel trial. Read the rest of this entry »





Law and Media Round Up – 13 May 2019

13 05 2019

The President of Family Division has published draft guidance as to reporting in the Family Courts [pdf]. There is a consultation running until 30 June 2019. This covered on the Transparency Project blog and there are reports in the Law Society Gazette and in the Press Gazette. Read the rest of this entry »





The Rule of Law and the Online Harms White Paper – Graham Smith

12 05 2019

Before the publication of the Online Harms White Paper on 8 April 2019 I proposed a Ten Point Rule of Law test to which it might usefully be subjected. Read the rest of this entry »





Straining the Alphabet Soup: Part 2, Drafting anonymity orders – Angus McCullough QC

8 05 2019

In Part 1 we looked at the circumstances in which a court may be prepared to grant anonymity in personal injury proceedings, and the applicable principles. In Part 2 I consider practical issues in the drafting of these orders, and problems encountered in this. Read the rest of this entry »





Straining the Alphabet Soup: Part 1, Anonymity orders in Personal Injury proceedings – Angus McCullough QC

7 05 2019

Amendments to CPR r.39.2; new Guidance issued by the Master of the Rolls; and a recent High Court decision refusing anonymity to a claimant prompt this review of anonymity orders in personal injury proceedings. Read the rest of this entry »





Law and Media Round Up – 6 May 2019

6 05 2019

The short Easter legal term began on Tuesday 30 April 2019 and ends 4½ weeks later on 24 May 2019.  This will be a busy term. This is the end of the Inforrm Easter break. Read the rest of this entry »