Case Law, Strasbourg: Mariya Alekhina v. Russia, Pussy Riot, the right to protest and to criticise the President, and the Patriarch – Dirk Voorhoof

18 09 2018

In its judgment of 17 July 2018 the ECtHR has found various violations of the rights of the members of the feminist punk band Pussy Riot. The ECtHR found violations under Article 3 (prohibition of inhuman or degrading treatment), Article 5 § 3 (right to liberty and security) and 6 §§ 1 and 3 (c) ECHR (right to fair trial), in relation to the conditions of their transportation and detention in the courthouse, their pre-trial detention, the treatment during the court hearings (being exposed to public view in a glass dock surrounded by armed police), and restrictions to legal assistance. Read the rest of this entry »





Law and Media, Summary Summer Round Up – 17 September 2018

17 09 2018

The legal term ended on 31 July 2018 and over our summer break we have not published any “Law and Media Round Ups”.  Regular round ups will not begin until October but this “Summer Round Up” draws attention to developments over the past 7 weeks and some forthcoming cases. Read the rest of this entry »





Ten things you should know about Instagram’s terms of use – Hayleigh Bosher

16 09 2018

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Do you use Instagram? Probably. Did you read the terms of use? Probably not. You’re not alone. Most people don’t read terms and conditions. So here are some key things to know and understand about Instagram. Read the rest of this entry »





Case Law, Australia: Wagner v Harbour Radio Pty: Defamatory radio broadcasts result in largest ever damages award, $3.7 million – Stuart Gibson

15 09 2018

In the case of Wagner & ors v  Harbour Radio & ors ([2018] QSC 201) the Supreme Court of Queensland awarded a record total of $3.7 million to four brothers over comments made by controversial broadcast Alan Jones in 27 radio broadcasts which conveyed 76 defamatory imputations in relation to the collapse of a dam wall at a quarry owned by the brothers during floods in 2011.  Read the rest of this entry »





Big Brother Watch v UK: What are the implications for the Investigatory Powers Act? – Graham Smith

14 09 2018

Yesterday I was transported back in time, to that surreal period following the Snowden revelations in 2013 when anyone who knew anything about the previously obscure RIPA (Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000) was in demand to explain how it was that GCHQ was empowered to conduct bulk interception on a previously unimagined scale. Read the rest of this entry »





Censorship through the millennia. And trying to locate it in the 21st Century – Peter D. McDonald

13 09 2018

File 20180824 149475 xbgl2p.jpg?ixlib=rb 1.1Once upon a time we all knew what censorship was, who the good and bad guys were, and what could be done to make the world a better place. Look up the noun “censor” in the Oxford English Dictionary and you’ll find an outline of a much-told story under definition 2 (b): Read the rest of this entry »





Case Law, Australia: Moroney v Zegers, Lying defamation defendant shot down by Sporting Shooters – Justin Castelan

12 09 2018

For a short time in 2012, Karel Zegers was the Acting President of the Victorian branch of the Sporting Shooters Association of Australia (“SSAAV”). His position on the Board was up for election in August that year and he decided to set up a website to run his campaign: shootersvictoria.com.  Read the rest of this entry »