U.K. proposal to ‘Bcc’ law enforcement on messaging apps threatens global privacy – Paulo Garcia

6 07 2019

The term “ghost protocol” might remind you of a famous blockbuster starring Tom Cruise, but here it applies to a new proposal by the Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ) in the United Kingdom. Read the rest of this entry »





Putting children at the centre: is re-designing the digital environment possible? – Mariya Stoilova and Sonia Livingstone

23 06 2019

Children (and adults alike) seem to be ‘playing tag’ with a sophisticated and fast-changing digital environment whose privacy parameters are hard to define and consequences even harder to predict. Read the rest of this entry »





Data Protection: ICO reports on Adtech and Real Time Bidding, finds that data protection laws are being ignored

22 06 2019

On 20 June 2019 the Information Commissioner’s Office published its Update Report into Adtech and Real Time Bidding [pdf] dealing with the use of personal data the real time bidding (“RTB”) process in online advertising. Read the rest of this entry »





Australia: Four laws that need urgent reform to protect both national security and press freedom – Denis Muller

21 06 2019

In a perfect world, Australia would introduce constitutional protections for freedom of the press. But since the chances of that are next to zero, it might be more productive to look instead at what might be done to make the existing web of secrecy laws less repressive. Read the rest of this entry »





The surprising post-election debate around online freedom of expression in Germany – Nora Kroeger

5 06 2019

One week before the EU elections, the German YouTuber Rezo published an almost hour-long video titled “The destruction of the CDU”. In the video, the influencer – who usually posts light-hearted apolitical content such as YouTube challenges – sets out a broad range of arguments why the disregard of scientific evidence and resulting incompetent policy-making by the German parties CDU, SPD (and also far-right AFD) should convince citizens to vote for other parties. Read the rest of this entry »





Consultations on Online Harms and Corporate Transparency: Reminder to Readers

31 05 2019

There are, at present, two open Government consultations of particular interest to readers of Inforrm.  These deal with “Online Harms” and with “Corporate Transparency”.  Responses must be lodged before the consultation deadlines. Read the rest of this entry »





What we know about how political parties use Facebook advertising and what we don’t – Katharine Dommett and Sam Power

29 05 2019

Over the past five years, Facebook has exploded as a site for political advertising and election campaigning. Donald Trump, Jeremy Corbyn and Angela Merkel have all used it to promote their ideas. Yet despite the increasing prominence of Facebook, we currently know very little about how much political parties actually spend on the platform. Read the rest of this entry »





Case Law: R (Privacy International) v Investigatory Powers Tribunal, Parliament’s “ouster” of High Court judicial review powers is not binding – Omar Qureshi, Dan Tench and Cathryn Hopkins

23 05 2019

On 15 May 2019, the Supreme Court handed down its judgment in the case of R (on the application of Privacy International) v Investigatory Powers Tribunal ([2019] UKSC 22), deciding by a slim majority of 4:3 that an “ouster clause” in section 67(8) of the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000 (“RIPA”) that purports to exclude from challenge or appeal any decision of the Investigatory Powers Tribunal (“IPT”), does not prevent a judicial review challenge based on an error of law. Read the rest of this entry »





The ‘Christchurch Call’ is just a start. Now we need to push for systemic change – Kevin Veale

17 05 2019

File 20190516 69186 15si7o9.jpg?ixlib=rb 1.1The “Christchurch Call” summit has made specific progress, with tech companies and world leaders signing an agreement to eliminate terrorist and violent extremist content online. The question now is how we collectively follow up on its promise. Read the rest of this entry »





What the UK’s Online Harms white paper teaches us about internet regulation – Richard Haggart and Natasha Tusikov

22 04 2019

File 20190417 139094 88004o.jpg?ixlib=rb 1.1Amidst a growing consensus that social media and online platforms must be subject to public regulation, the United Kingdom has stepped up to do just that. In doing so, it has made a lot of people very angry. Read the rest of this entry »