Coronavirus: public confused and suspicious over government’s death toll information – Stephen Cushion, Maria Kyriakidou, Marina Morani, Nikki Soo

24 05 2020

The decision by the UK government to stop publishing the international comparative death rate in its daily briefings from May 12 attracted widespread criticism. Many people saw this as an attempt to cover up just how badly the UK has handled the pandemic. Read the rest of this entry »





The Government is giving away your money to the Mail and the Sun – Brian Cathcart

30 04 2020

The whole affair could hardly be more sleazy and murky, but the truth is now clear: the Government is giving tens of millions of pounds of taxpayers’ money to the corporate press, including the Daily Mail and the Sun. Read the rest of this entry »





Life in the Time of CoronaVirus #2: the Rule of Law, a Shifting Political Landscape and a “Clash of Arms” – Valerie Eliot Smith

7 04 2020

The first part of this post, “Life in the Time of CoronaVirus: Democracy, Data and Saving Lives“, was to be followed up by a second part: “The Rule of Law and Cultural Differences”. Read the rest of this entry »





With COVID-19 containment efforts, what are the privacy rights of patients? – Hongyu Zhang

15 03 2020

As an epicenter of the COVID-19 outbreak, China has launched an unprecedented effort to control the disease, locking down Wuhan in the province of Hubei — a megacity of 11 million people. Read the rest of this entry »





Coronavirus, Media Reportage and Patient Privacy – Jelena Gligorijevic

7 03 2020

How does the law protect the privacy of individuals infected with a novel, rapidly spreading virus, against intrusive media reportage? In some common law jurisdictions, including England and Wales, and New Zealand, tort law offers some protection, and media ought to bear this in mind. In others, including Australia, such protection against intrusive media activities per se has not yet been recognised by the courts. Read the rest of this entry »





The Conservative Government, the Press and the Judiciary, Unfinished Business? – Julian Petley and Dimitrios Giannoulopoulos

28 02 2020

On 27 January, Suella Braverman, a former chair of the European Research Group, a junior minister at the former Department for Exiting the EU and an MP with a consistent record on voting against laws to promote human rights, wrote an article for the Conservative Home website in which she argued that: Read the rest of this entry »





Election coverage: thanks to Brexit, Labour had a media mountain to climb – David Deacon, David Smith and Dominic Wring

24 12 2019

You don’t have to deny the growing political significance of social media to accept that the mainstream media continue to play a vital role in informing and priming public opinion during elections. Moreover, both worlds are deeply connected. Fewer people are buying newspapers but plenty are accessing the same content online. Read the rest of this entry »





UK election 2019: is Brexit dominating the media campaign? – David Deacon, David Smith and Dominic Wring

26 11 2019

Is the UK’s 2019 election a single-issue campaign centered on Brexit? Some newspapers clearly think so, with the Daily Mail and the Sun having already branded it the “Brexmas Election”. These declarations reflect a strong desire to see the Conservatives triumph and for Boris Johnson to enact his core promise to “Get Brexit Done”. Read the rest of this entry »





Facebook’s not a threat to the UK election – Anamaria Dutceac Segesten,

22 11 2019

The Cambridge Analytica scandal of March 2018 changed the status of Facebook forever. The revelation that a political consultancy had illicitly gained access to the data of millions of Facebook users forced the company to change its approach to privacy, including its rules and algorithms. Read the rest of this entry »





Free broadband: internet access is now a human right, no matter who pays the bills – Merten Reglitz

19 11 2019

The UK Labour Party is promising to provide free broadband internet to every British household by 2030 if it wins the 2019 election. To do this, the party would nationalise the broadband infrastructure business of BT and tax internet giants like Google and Facebook. Read the rest of this entry »