Case Law: R (Privacy International) v Investigatory Powers Tribunal, Parliament’s “ouster” of High Court judicial review powers is not binding – Omar Qureshi, Dan Tench and Cathryn Hopkins

23 05 2019

On 15 May 2019, the Supreme Court handed down its judgment in the case of R (on the application of Privacy International) v Investigatory Powers Tribunal ([2019] UKSC 22), deciding by a slim majority of 4:3 that an “ouster clause” in section 67(8) of the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000 (“RIPA”) that purports to exclude from challenge or appeal any decision of the Investigatory Powers Tribunal (“IPT”), does not prevent a judicial review challenge based on an error of law. Read the rest of this entry »





The ‘Christchurch Call’ is just a start. Now we need to push for systemic change – Kevin Veale

17 05 2019

File 20190516 69186 15si7o9.jpg?ixlib=rb 1.1The “Christchurch Call” summit has made specific progress, with tech companies and world leaders signing an agreement to eliminate terrorist and violent extremist content online. The question now is how we collectively follow up on its promise. Read the rest of this entry »





What the UK’s Online Harms white paper teaches us about internet regulation – Richard Haggart and Natasha Tusikov

22 04 2019

File 20190417 139094 88004o.jpg?ixlib=rb 1.1Amidst a growing consensus that social media and online platforms must be subject to public regulation, the United Kingdom has stepped up to do just that. In doing so, it has made a lot of people very angry. Read the rest of this entry »





The White Paper on Online Harms. Keep in mind the bigger picture – Damian Tambini

18 04 2019

Protests that the government proposals for a duty of care on social media  are a threat to free speech appear to be missing the point. European standards on freedom of expression give states ample justification for regulating speech that is harmful or undermines national security – if regulations are proportionate, prescribed by law and pursue a legitimate aim. Read the rest of this entry »





Media Reform Coalition: Media Manifesto 2019

10 04 2019

The Media Reform Coalition (“MRC”) has pulled together extensive academic research and a number of briefing reports produced by, and in consultation with, a broad range of experts and stakeholders to produce its latest Media Manifesto. Read the rest of this entry »





Politicians suing for defamation is usually a bad idea: here’s why – Michael Douglas

29 03 2019

File 20190318 28487 aa8az9.jpg?ixlib=rb 1.1When The Project host Waleed Aly began his editorial in the wake of the Christchurch massacre, he apologised that “these won’t be my best words”. Read the rest of this entry »





How governments use Big Data to violate human rights – Andrew Thompson

20 01 2019

The right to privacy has become a pressing human rights issue. And rightly so. Big data — combined with artificial intelligence and facial recognition software — has the capacity to intrude on people’s lives in unprecedented ways, in some cases on a massive scale. Read the rest of this entry »





Tackling the Information Crisis: A new report from LSE – Professor Charlie Beckett

22 11 2018

What kind of information society do you want? How should we reduce the amount of misinformation? How can we protect democracy from digital damage? How can we help people make the most of the extraordinary opportunities of the Internet while avoiding the harm it can cause? Read the rest of this entry »





Ethical questions over Number 10’s social media push for Brexit deal – Toby S James

17 11 2018

File 20181116 172710 5aj23c.jpg?ixlib=rb 1.1

The prime minister is on a mission to defend her Brexit deal. After a three-hour grilling from MPs on November 15, Theresa May came out fighting in a press conference, dismissing the idea that she would be ousted as Conservative Party leader. The next morning, she took callers’ questions about the draft Withdrawal Agreement on LBC radio. Read the rest of this entry »





Entering the Era of Internet Accountability: The Implications for Copyright – Hugh Stephens

7 11 2018

I recently had the honour to be invited to give a guest lecture to the Copyright Society of Australia in Sydney. My talk focussed on how the Internet has evolved over the past twenty years, leading to a severe imbalance between Internet platforms and the creative community because of the abuse and misuse of safe harbours, and how recent events have put the big platforms in the spotlight—indeed in the crosshairs of the public and politicians. Read the rest of this entry »