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Category: Government and Policy (Page 1 of 37)

The Online Safety Bill: Everything in Moderation?, Parts III, IV and V, Criticism, Consequences and Conclusion – Naomi Kilcoyne

Part 3: Criticism

In a rare show of national unity, disapproval of the OSB has spanned both ends of the political spectrum. Alongside criticism from the Labour culture minister, Conservative politicians have also weighed in on the ‘legal but harmful’ debate. Thinktanks and non-profit groups have likewise been apprehensive.

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The UK Data Protection and Digital Information Bill: Reviewing Proposed Law Enforcement and Intelligence Services Data Processing Reforms – Tim Cochrane

How businesses can prepare for the Data Protection and Digital Information Bill imageThe Data Protection and Digital Information Bill, currently before the UK Parliament, proposes a slew of changes to UK data protection law, including law enforcement and intelligence services data processing regulated by Parts 3 and 4 of the Data Protection Act 2018 (DPA 2018) respectively. Continue reading

The Devil in the Detail? The Government’s Response on SLAPPs and clause 4 of the Bill of Rights Bill – Mark Hanna

Just what exactly is the Government proposing in its recently published Response to the Call for Evidence on Strategic Lawsuits Against Public Participation (SLAPPs)? As one commentator on this forum has pointed out, the ‘devil is in the detail’ of the Response, and the suggested reforms raise ‘more questions than answers’. This is not to question the existence of SLAPPs, or to cast aspersions on the sudden willingness for public debate on the issue. Continue reading

Australia: Farm Transparency and New South Wales, What this High Court decision on filming animals in farms and abattoirs really means – Danielle Ireland-Piper

What do farm animals have to do with the Australian Constitution? Should the public know what happens in abattoirs and farms? Do we have the right to publish footage of what happens to animals in slaughterhouses? Should governments be able to make laws criminalising it? How do we best protect the privacy of farmers and prevent trespass? Continue reading

What impact might the Bill of Rights Bill have on freedom of expression cases? – Godwin Busuttil

There are three clauses of the Bill of Rights Bill [pdf] which, if enacted in their current form, would have a direct impact on freedom of expression cases. These are clauses 4 (‘Freedom of speech’), 21 (‘Limit on court’s power to require disclosure of journalistic sources’) and 22 (‘Limit on court’s power to grant relief that affects freedom of expression’). Continue reading

A SLAPP-up Meal for Journalists and a Dog’s Breakfast for the Rest: The Government’s ‘Opening Salvo’ Against SLAPPs – Paul Wragg

Back in March, exercising rare concern for those exploited by the super-rich, the government issued an ‘urgent call for evidence’ that promised, based upon ‘third party and anecdotal evidence’ [42], ‘quick and effective’ action against Strategic Litigation against Public Participation (“SLAPPs”). Continue reading

SLAPPs: Government Response to Call for Evidence, More Questions than Answers

On 20 July 2022 the Government published its response to the call for evidence on Strategic Lawsuits against Public Participation [pdf] with a Foreword by Justice Secretary, Dominic Raab.   This document summarises the evidence on each of the 45 questions posed in the “Call for Evidence” and sets out the Government response to each one.   It is a disappointing document which includes no clear concrete proposals and is, in important respects, wholly inadequate. Continue reading

Newspapers leap to defence of “extremists’ loophole” in the Online Safety Bill, as Government plans to protect the press from accountability unravel – Nathan Sparkes

Yesterday in the House of Commons the Government was skewered over its plans to allow extremists or dictators to set up front organisations in the UK and brand themselves “news publishers”, to benefit from a wide ranging and poorly drafted exemption to the Online Safety Bill.  Several newspapers have rushed to defend the loophole because they themselves would benefit from. Continue reading

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