The International Forum for Responsible Media Blog

Month: November 2019 (Page 1 of 4)

Case Law, Strasbourg: Pryanishnikov v. Russia: Refusal to grant a licence for the reproduction of erotic material violated Article 10 – Argyro Chatzinikolaou

In Pryanishnikov v Russia ([2019] ECHR 614), a case concerning the authorities’ refusal to grant the applicant a film reproduction license, the European Court of Human Rights found a violation of the right to freedom of expression, as the only reason advanced by the domestic courts for the refusal of the relevant license had been based on mere suspicions rather than findings of fact. Continue reading

Australia: A push to make social media companies liable in defamation is great for newspapers and lawyers, but not you – Michael Douglas

At his Wednesday 20 November 2019 address to the National Press Club, Attorney-General Christian Porter said the federal government is pursuing “immediate” defamation law reform. The announcement seemed a bit odd, as defamation is a subject for state and territory governments to legislate on. A NSW-led law reform process has been ongoing for years. Continue reading

UK election 2019: is Brexit dominating the media campaign? – David Deacon, David Smith and Dominic Wring

Is the UK’s 2019 election a single-issue campaign centered on Brexit? Some newspapers clearly think so, with the Daily Mail and the Sun having already branded it the “Brexmas Election”. These declarations reflect a strong desire to see the Conservatives triumph and for Boris Johnson to enact his core promise to “Get Brexit Done”. Continue reading

Reporting the Family Courts: the President’s New Clothes – FC Reporting Watch

This week has seen reports in the legal press of a speech in which the President of the Family Division,  Sir Andrew McFarlane, set out an idea for a research project about news reports containing accounts of how family courts have handled domestic abuse claims. See for example : Press attacks on family courts should be assessed – McFarlane by Monidipa Fouzder in The Gazette. Here we ask : But could it work? Continue reading

Ireland: The Government’s plans for a digital safety commissioner proceed apace – Eoin O’Dell

In my earlier post on the demise of the UK’s current age-verification plans for online porn – and what that might mean for Ireland’s proposed Digital Safety Commissioner, I noted that long-standing Irish Government policy is to establish such a Commissioner, and that the current timetable is that it is intended to bring forward the necessary legislation before the end of the year. Continue reading

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