Why the Duchess of Sussex is justified in suing the “Mail on Sunday” – Stuart Gibson

17 11 2019

There’s nothing quite like a Royal Lawsuit to get the English media and for that matter English lawyers’ tails wagging. London Legal has been abuzz over the last week since word got out that the Duchess of Sussex had begun legal action against The Mail on Sunday over a claim that it unlawfully published a private handwritten letter of hers to her father Thomas Markle. Read the rest of this entry »





Global Freedom of Expression, Columbia University: Newsletter

16 11 2019

Columbia Global Freedom of Expression seeks to contribute to the development of an integrated and progressive jurisprudence and understanding on freedom of expression and information around the world.  It maintains an extensive database of international case law. This is its newsletter dealing with recent developments  in the field. Read the rest of this entry »





Analysis shows horrifying extent of abuse sent to women MPs via Twitter – Susan Watson

16 11 2019

The approach of a rare December election in the UK has many campaigners feeling chills. What misery awaits them on the dark, cold streets as they try to convince voters to support their party? My preliminary research reveals that the women who bid for political office over the next six weeks have more to worry about than sore feet and aggressive dogs. Read the rest of this entry »





The European Court of Human Rights and the right to privacy in the workplace, Bărbulescu and Lopez Ribalda – Peter Coe

15 11 2019

In November I will be Chairing a panel on Data Rights and the Rule of Law at the Information Law and Policy Centre’s Annual Conference at the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies. This got me thinking about data protection, privacy and the Rule of Law more generally. Read the rest of this entry »





Daily Mail publication of intimate images of Congresswoman Katie Hill’s sparks a conversation about ISP liability in revenge pornography cases – Colette Allen

14 11 2019

Katie Hill, the former Representative for Los Angeles, quit Congress last Thursday after intimate photos were leaked by her ex-husband and an investigation was launched into whether she had a relationship with her subordinate. In a tearful resignation video, Hill vowed to dedicate the rest of her career to fighting revenge pornography and getting justice for victims. In the UK, the Daily Mail stuck its nose in by displaying the images on their website last week. This incident seemed as good a time as any to look into what avenues survivor-victims of revenge pornography can take under current English and Welsh law. Read the rest of this entry »





Is there a crisis in British Journalism? Consider this – Brian Cathcart

13 11 2019

A shameful catalogue of events has been unfolding, but most journalists refuse to face it – or report it.  All of these are current or recent: Read the rest of this entry »





Libel: Tinkler, Koutsogiannis and Sheikh, distinguishing natural and ordinary meaning from the reactions of a Book Club – Erica Henshilwood

12 11 2019

Since the removal of the presumption that actions will be tried by juries, the preliminary determination of ‘meaning’ has become commonplace in libel cases.  This involves the (artificial) exercise of determining the ‘single meaning’ of the words complained about. Read the rest of this entry »





Law and Media Round Up – 11 November 2019

11 11 2019

The leading phone hacking campaigner and Labour Deputy Leader Tom Watson MP has announced that he is standing down as an MP. Meanwhile Byline Investigates reports that twelve editors at The Sun have been accused at the High Court of phone hacking and commissioning illegal private investigators. The list of names features members of The Sun’s leadership team stretching back more than 20 years. Read the rest of this entry »





United States: Is Assange Entitled to Full First Amendment Protection? – James C Goodale

10 11 2019

At a recent panel discussion at Columbia University on Press Freedom, National Security and Whistleblowers, at which the case of Julian Assange was discussed, no one on the panel mentioned the application of the First Amendment to the defense of Julian Assange. Rather, members of the panel effectively suggested his actions could be judged by a public interest or public concern standard. Read the rest of this entry »





Global Freedom of Expression, Columbia University: Newsletter

10 11 2019

Columbia Global Freedom of Expression seeks to contribute to the development of an integrated and progressive jurisprudence and understanding on freedom of expression and information around the world.  It maintains an extensive database of international case law. This is its newsletter dealing with recent developments  in the field. Read the rest of this entry »