Case Law: Vidal-Hall v Google, Distress damages can be awarded under s 13 DPA without pecuniary loss (and misuse of private information is a tort) – Lorna Skinner

31 03 2015

igooglemagesIn Vidal-Hall v, Google Inc ([2015] EWCA Civ 311) the Court of Appeal dismissed Google’s appeal from the decision of Tugendhat J in which he declined to declare that the English court did not have jurisdiction to hear data protection and misuse of private information claims brought against it. Read the rest of this entry »





Law and Media Round Up – 30 March 2015

30 03 2015

Weekly Round UPThere were three important decisions of the appellate courts handed down this week, covering freedom of information, data protection and the common law offence of misconduct in public office as applied to journalists paying public officials. Read the rest of this entry »





Spain: The Right to Be Forgotten Does Not Apply to Google’s “Blogger” platform – Miguel Peguera

29 03 2015

BloggerIn a recently reported ruling, the Spanish National High Court held that Google is not responsible for the processing of personal data on blog hosted on Google’s owned Blogger, and therefore, that the so called “right to be forgotten” established by the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) in the Google Spain case does not extend to a blogging platform. Read the rest of this entry »





Case Law: R (Evans) v HM Attorney-General, The Tale of the Black Spider, the Supreme Court Speaks – Matthew Flinn

29 03 2015

14786526_page_3_let_346471cAnd so, the long legal saga of the Black Spider Letters finally comes to a close.  I last blogged about this case back in October 2012. At that time, the Attorney General had ignited controversy by invoking a little-known power under section 53 of the Freedom of Information Act 2000 (FOIA). Read the rest of this entry »





Dicing with death: the sensational reporting of suicide and death to sell newspapers – Daisy Cooper

28 03 2015

NewspapersThe daily newspapers in February made for sombre reading. There were five stories, comprising 13 articles, where editors used instances of suicide and death to sell papers. Read the rest of this entry »





Case Law, Strasbourg: Almeida Leitão Bento Fernandes v. Portugal, No violation of Article 10 in ‘roman à clef’ case – Hugh Tomlinson QC

27 03 2015

Torre de MoncorvoIn the case of Almeida Leitão Bento Fernandes v. Portugal (Judgment of 12 March 2015)(available only in French), the First Section of the Court of Human Rights held that the a libel conviction and award of damages against an author whose novel was held to have libelled members of her husband’s family did not violate Article 10. Read the rest of this entry »





Media Standards Trust: Who was hacked? A New Report Investigates – Martin Moore

26 03 2015

image1Reading coverage of the various hacking trials (News of the World in 2013/14 and now Mirror Group Newspapers) you could be forgiven for thinking phone hacking was all about celebrities. Celebrities attract attention, attract news interest, and sell papers. This is perhaps why many of the news reports of phone hacking have concentrated on celebrities and are illustrated with photographs of celebrities. Read the rest of this entry »





Lee Kuan Yew and freedom of expression: the libel action as a means of silencing political opposition – Tessa Evans

26 03 2015

Lee Kuan YewLee Kuan Yew, Singapore’s prime minister of 31 years and the man credited with turning the city-state into one of Asia’s most prosperous countries, died last week at the age of 91. Read the rest of this entry »





Hacked Off: Launch of IPSO Watch initiative to monitor the work and decisions of IPSO

25 03 2015

IPSO WatchSix months on from the press regulator IPSO starting work, Hacked Off has launched “IPSO WATCH” to act as a voice for newspaper consumers who have complained about press coverage and got nowhere. Read the rest of this entry »





Paying the price, the cost of dealing with the Sun – James Doleman

25 03 2015

New Sunday Sun tabloidThe not guilty verdicts at the recent trial of four Sun journalists on charges relating to payments to public officials has led to the Metropolitan Police’s “Operation Elveden” being branded a failure by The Sun and other tabloid newspapers. Demands to “stop the witch-hunt” and in one case a comparison between the Crown Prosecution Service and Hitler have graced our red-top press. Read the rest of this entry »