Top 10 Defamation Cases of 2019: a selection – Suneet Sharma

31 12 2019

Inforrm reported on a large number of defamation cases from around the world in 2019.  Following my widely read posts on 2017 and 2018 defamation cases, this is my personal selection of the most legally and factually interesting cases from England, Australia and the United States from the past year. Read the rest of this entry »





What Boris Johnson’s election win means for British broadcasting – Kerry Traynor

30 12 2019

No sooner had the ballots closed than Boris Johnson’s new government was advancing and accelerating its attack on public service broadcasting, threatening to decriminalise nonpayment of the licence fee, boycott the BBC’s flagship Today programme and review the remit of Channel 4. Read the rest of this entry »





Case Law, Australia: Wagner v Nine Network Australia PL, 60 Minutes indefensible defamation: $4 more million for the Wagner family – Justin Castelan

29 12 2019

Denis, John, Neill and Joe Wagner operated a quarry in Grantham in Queensland. In January 2011, there was a flood that devastated the town and killed 12 people. A Commission of Inquiry made findings that the disaster was a natural event and no human action caused it or could have prevented it – not much of a story, so the media persisted. Read the rest of this entry »





Case Law: Triplark Ltd v Northwood Hall, Trial of preliminary issues on meaning and opinion – James Downes

27 12 2019

On 19 December 2019, Warby J gave Judgment in the case of Triplark Limited v  Northwood Hall (Freehold) Limited (2) Philip Whale (3) David Wismayer [2019] EWHC 3494 (QB).  He found that the words complained of made a number of factual allegations defamatory of the Claimant. Read the rest of this entry »





Election coverage: thanks to Brexit, Labour had a media mountain to climb – David Deacon, David Smith and Dominic Wring

24 12 2019

You don’t have to deny the growing political significance of social media to accept that the mainstream media continue to play a vital role in informing and priming public opinion during elections. Moreover, both worlds are deeply connected. Fewer people are buying newspapers but plenty are accessing the same content online. Read the rest of this entry »





Case Law, Strasbourg: Tagiyev and Huseynov v. Azerbaijan, Journalist and editor’s conviction for incitement to religious hatred violated Article 10 – Ronan Ó Fathaigh and Dirk Voorhoof

23 12 2019

In Tagiyev and Huseynov v. Azerbaijan, the European Court of Human Rights unanimously held that the conviction and imprisonment of Azerbaijani journalist Rafig Nazir oglu Tagiyev, and editor Samir Sadagat oglu Huseynov, for incitement to religious hatred, violated their right to freedom of expression under Article 10 ECHR. Read the rest of this entry »





Inforrm is taking a winter break

21 12 2019

Now that the legal term has ended, Inforrm is taking a winter break for a few weeks to allow the editorial team to relax. We will have a some occasional posts over the next fortnight but the full normal service will not be resumed until 13 January 2020. Read the rest of this entry »





Ireland: Damages for Data Protection Breaches 2, Why Murphy v Callinan is wrong – Eoin O’Dell

20 12 2019

In my previous post in this series, I argued (yet again) that Collins v FBD Insurance plc [2013] IEHC 137 (14 March 2013) was wrongly decided. It precludes a claim for damages for distress for breach of data protection rights, pursuant to section 7 of the Data Protection Act, 1988 (also here) [hereafter: section 7 DPA88]. Read the rest of this entry »





Ireland: Damages for Data Protection Breaches, 1: Why Collins v FBD Insurance is wrong (again) – Eoin O’Dell

19 12 2019

A story in the newspapers this morning has made me think once again about some of the weaknesses in Irish law relating to damages for data protection infringements. Read the rest of this entry »





Facebook to reopen CasaPound Italy’s page, Victory for freedom of speech? – Nataly Tedone

18 12 2019

On 12 December 2019 a civil court in Rome ruled in favour of CasaPound Italy (CPI) against Facebook’s decision to close the far-right party’s profile in September and ordered the social network to reopen it with immediate effect and pay the group €800 for each day the account has been closed. Read the rest of this entry »