How to regulate Facebook and the online giants in one word: transparency – George Brock

19 10 2017

File 20171016 31002 qye930.jpg?ixlib=rb 1.1Demands to regulate hi-tech companies like Google, Facebook and Apple are being heard at deafening pitch almost every day. This rush by the political herd on both sides of the Atlantic to make new laws (or to enforce the breakup of these corporations) is no better focused or thought-out than the extraordinary degree of latitude which the same political classes were prepared to allow the same online platforms only a couple of years ago. Read the rest of this entry »





Leveson: Karen Bradley gets it wrong five times – Brian Cathcart

13 10 2017
The Media Secretary, Karen Bradley, told the Commons Media Select Committee this week that she will announce the long-overdue outcome of her consultation on Section 40 and Leveson Part Two ‘shortly’ – hinting it would be in the next few weeks.

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Why regulators like Ofcom are dropping the ball on ‘Fake News’, dark advertising and extremism – Leighton Andrews

28 09 2017

During the course of 2017, the large ‘big tech’ internet intermediaries have come under an unprecedented degree of scrutiny worldwide.  Facebook posts and Google search listings have come under fire as enablers of so-called ‘fake news’ and propaganda by extremist, terrorist and hate groups, with Facebook’s role in ‘dark advertising’ by hostile foreign powers particularly in the spotlight.  Read the rest of this entry »





The Press Problem: How to Avoid Hate When Discussing Muslim Affairs – Aidan White

2 09 2017

IPSO has received hundreds of complaints concerning a column in the British newspaper ‘The Sun’ in which the phrase “the Muslim Problem” – by many perceived as a reference to the Nazi terminology “the Jewish Problem” – was used. Read the rest of this entry »





The dangers of ‘doxing’ and the implications for media regulation – David Brake

24 08 2017

The events in the US city of Charlottesville where a far-right protest turned violent raise a multitude of questions – some of which touch upon media ethics and media regulation. Especially the practice of ‘doxing’ – sharing individuals’ personal information online to cause them harm – has significant ethical and regulatory ramifications.  Read the rest of this entry »





Prince Harry and David Beckham: a close look at IPSO’s approach to privacy – Oliver Lock

14 08 2017

IPSO recently published its decisions on two separate privacy complaints brought against the Mail Online: the first by Prince Harry (which was upheld) and the second by David and Victoria Beckham (which was not). Read the rest of this entry »





Mainstream news media have earned the distrust they complain of – Brian Cathcart

12 08 2017

‘Can you trust the mainstream media?’ asks the very mainstream Observer in a 5,000-word analysis by Andrew Harrison, and then it supplies the answer, pretty resoundingly: ‘Yes, you can!’ Read the rest of this entry »