Guidance issued to court staff on supporting media access – Paul Magrath

1 11 2018

Last week the Ministry of Justice issued Guidance to staff on supporting media access to courts and tribunals as “part of a wider effort to build stronger working relationships between courts and the press and maintain the principle of open justice as we increasingly digitise court services.” Read the rest of this entry »





Spent Convictions: The Foibles of the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act within the Context of Internet Permanence – Samuel McCann

14 10 2018

The shockwaves of a criminal conviction can be felt far beyond the conclusion of any sentence; the stigma of criminality often frustrates social interaction and employment long into the future. The prospect of being labelled a ‘criminal’ by the State can frequently be as great a source of consternation as the punishment itself. Read the rest of this entry »





The Muslim Foster Carer Case: the final chapter – Transparency Project Reporting Watch

19 09 2018

Last autumn we covered the so-called ‘muslim foster carer’ case, over a number of blog posts (you can find those posts here). Last week, just as we’d given up hope of ever finding out what happened to the little girl at the heart of the case, the judgment is out. Or, to be precise – Tower Hamlets have provided selected journalists with a copy of an authorised summary of the judgment. (We know at least one journalist who has been hammering on the door of every judge he can think of to try and get this flipping summary. Our own email to the judicial press office went unanswered). Read the rest of this entry »





Clearing your name: the devil is in the detail – Alistair Parker

11 08 2018

Statistically, most people charged with criminal offences are guilty as charged. In fact, the vast majority either plead ‘guilty’ of their own volition, or are found guilty at trial and are sentenced. Quite apart from the sentencing, there are rules about how long those convictions remain ‘live’ (meaning they must be disclosed to potential employers). Read the rest of this entry »





Consultation on Open Justice: Proposed Changes to CPR Part 39

7 08 2018

The Ministry of Justice is consulting on proposed changes to CPR Part 39 “Miscellaneous Provisions relating to Hearings”.  The consultation opened on 12 July 2018 and closes on 23 August 2018.  Responses can be by completion of an Online Survey. Read the rest of this entry »





Case law: R v Sarker: Reporting restrictions during trials must not be too easily imposed – Oscar Davies

23 06 2018

On 13 June 2018 the Court of Appeal gave judgment on an appeal by the BBC against a reporting restriction order imposed on 22 January 2018, the first day of the trial of the Defendant, Sudip Sarker ([2018] EWCA Crim 1341). Read the rest of this entry »





The law on revelation of jury deliberations after the Thorpe trial – Alex Bailin QC

15 06 2018

In the wake of the BBC drama on the Jeremy Thorpe trial, Geoffrey Robertson QC wrote an illuminating piece about the contempt proceedings brought against the New Statesman for its interview with a Thorpe trial juror, who had explained that the jury felt obliged to acquit once the performance-related payment agreement with Bessell and The Sunday Telegraph had been revealed to them. Read the rest of this entry »