Case Law: ABC v Google, Claimant who refused to tell the court or his opponent who he was runs out of track – Elisabeth Mason

5 12 2019

In ABC v Google LLC [2019] EWHC 3020 (QB) the High Court dismissed the latest attempt by an anonymous litigant-in-person (‘ABC’) to continue his ‘right to be forgotten’ claim against Google.  The claim concerned Google’s failure to block access to historic news reports concerning ABC (whomever he may be).  Extraordinarily, ABC pursued his claim for nearly two years without ever identifying himself either to his opponent or to the court. Read the rest of this entry »





Case Law: Orphans from Syria, Reporting Restriction Orders and Children – FC ReportingWatch

3 12 2019

Mr Justice Keehan last week published an extraordinary judgment of a mere 17 staccato paragraphs. It is called Re Orphans From Syria [2019] EWHC 3202 (Fam). It begins : Read the rest of this entry »





Justice for Grace Millane: a new Commonwealth contempt framework? – Erica Henshilwood

27 11 2019

The New Zealand Minister of Justice, Andrew Little, has called for an international judicial contempt framework to be agreed between NZ, the UK, Australia and Canada in an effort to address the (in)effectiveness of reporting restrictions in criminal trials today. Read the rest of this entry »





Reporting the Family Courts: the President’s New Clothes – FC Reporting Watch

24 11 2019

This week has seen reports in the legal press of a speech in which the President of the Family Division,  Sir Andrew McFarlane, set out an idea for a research project about news reports containing accounts of how family courts have handled domestic abuse claims. See for example : Press attacks on family courts should be assessed – McFarlane by Monidipa Fouzder in The Gazette. Here we ask : But could it work? Read the rest of this entry »





Court Reporting: President of Family Division issues new guidance on reporting the Family Courts

31 10 2019

The President of the Family Division, Sir Andrew McFarlane, has issued new Guidance as to “Reporting in the Family Courts” [pdf].  The guidance has been issued to assist the court, the parties and the media in circumstances where a reporter attending court may wish to apply to vary reporting restrictions. Read the rest of this entry »





Why we need a national commitment to open justice data – Judith Townend

13 10 2019

Justice ‘data’ – that is the information that arises from the process and administration of justice – is perhaps one of the most fundamentally important administrative data categories in public life. Read the rest of this entry »





Case Law: AAA v Rakoff, Lap dancers denied anonymity in privacy claim – Brett Wilson

6 10 2019

In AAA -v- Rakoff [2019] EWHC 2525 (QB) Mr Justice Nicklin set out the importance of claimants (and their lawyers) setting out a clear and consistent basis for seeking anonymity in civil proceedings. Read the rest of this entry »





BAILII and the re-use of judgments as public legal information – Paul Magrath

4 10 2019

For all practical purposes, the free legal database run by the British and Irish Legal Information Institute (BAILII) is an official source of judgments from senior courts that any member of the public or any journalist can use. Read the rest of this entry »






Case Comment: Cape Intermediate Holdings v Dring, “A victory for open justice” – Devina Shah

6 08 2019

In a decision described as a “victory for open justice”, the Supreme Court has held that non-parties to litigation are entitled to access certain documents from a trial to which it was not a party. Read the rest of this entry »