Why we need a national commitment to open justice data – Judith Townend

13 10 2019

Justice ‘data’ – that is the information that arises from the process and administration of justice – is perhaps one of the most fundamentally important administrative data categories in public life. Read the rest of this entry »





Case Law: AAA v Rakoff, Lap dancers denied anonymity in privacy claim – Brett Wilson

6 10 2019

In AAA -v- Rakoff [2019] EWHC 2525 (QB) Mr Justice Nicklin set out the importance of claimants (and their lawyers) setting out a clear and consistent basis for seeking anonymity in civil proceedings. Read the rest of this entry »





BAILII and the re-use of judgments as public legal information – Paul Magrath

4 10 2019

For all practical purposes, the free legal database run by the British and Irish Legal Information Institute (BAILII) is an official source of judgments from senior courts that any member of the public or any journalist can use. Read the rest of this entry »






Case Comment: Cape Intermediate Holdings v Dring, “A victory for open justice” – Devina Shah

6 08 2019

In a decision described as a “victory for open justice”, the Supreme Court has held that non-parties to litigation are entitled to access certain documents from a trial to which it was not a party. Read the rest of this entry »





Lifelong anonymity orders: do they still work in the social media age? – Faith Gordon and Julie Doughty

5 08 2019

Lifelong anonymity orders for adults who were convicted of crimes as children are rarely granted. In theory, these orders legally prevent a person ever being identified. But given that information is now shared at lightning speed across different platforms, can these orders still work in practice? Read the rest of this entry »





Case Law: MN v OP, Money, money, money, must be funny, in an [anonymised beneficiary’s] world, protecting child beneficiaries in variation of trust cases – Paul Magrath

8 06 2019

A typical plot development in old novels is the sudden discovery of unexpected wealth, usually in the form of an inheritance, or the discovery of a long lost will or hidden relationship to a wealthy benefactor.  Read the rest of this entry »





Reporting the Court of Protection: NB on Re NB – Barbara Rich

21 05 2019

At the beginning of April 2019, a Press Association report of an interim hearing at the Court of Protection provoked a number of newspaper headlines and outraged reactions, because it quoted a High Court judge, Mr Justice Hayden, as having spoken of a “fundamental human right” of a man to have sex with his wife.  Read the rest of this entry »





Anonymity and a Vulnerable Individual: The Troubling Case of Justyna – Valerie Eliot Smith

11 05 2019

On 8 March 2019, interim judgment was handed down in the apparently unremarkable case of Justyna Zeromska-Smith v United Lincolnshire Hospital Trust [2019] EWHC 552(QB). The decision appears to have been based on the following reasoning: Read the rest of this entry »





Straining the Alphabet Soup: Part 2, Drafting anonymity orders – Angus McCullough QC

8 05 2019

In Part 1 we looked at the circumstances in which a court may be prepared to grant anonymity in personal injury proceedings, and the applicable principles. In Part 2 I consider practical issues in the drafting of these orders, and problems encountered in this. Read the rest of this entry »