Litigation during lockdown: UK courts keep calm and carry on – Mathilde Groppo

3 04 2020

When the Prime Minister announced the lockdown on 23 March 2020, the UK effectively aligned its response to the COVID-19 pandemic to that of other European countries. For litigation practitioners, this raised a number of queries relating not only to the effect this would have on their practice as a whole, but also – more pragmatically – to the effect this would have on upcoming hearings and the conduct thereof. Read the rest of this entry »





Covid-19, the UK’s Coronavirus Bill and emergency ‘remote’ court hearings: what does it mean for open justice? – Judith Townend

24 03 2020

There will be an increasing use of ‘remote hearings’ in the courts in England and Wales in coming weeks and months, under existing law, and if extended provisions in the emergency Coronavirus Bill are passed. But there are important practical questions to consider if we wish to safeguard open justice. Read the rest of this entry »





Re Al M: an oasis of transparency in a desert of secrets – Athalie Matthews

18 03 2020

There was never going to be anything ordinary about a custody battle between the billionaire ruler of Dubai and a Jordanian Princess. Read the rest of this entry »





Northern Ireland: Overview of internet intermediary and media law cases in 2019, Part 2 – Ciaran O’Shiel and Charlotte Turk

7 02 2020

In Part 1, we looked at judgments from the Crown Court and High Court in Northern Ireland dealing with a source disclosure order and an interim application concerning Facebook. In Part 2, we consider the Court of Appeal’s judgment involving reporting restriction orders and Sir John Gillen’s report into the law on serious sexual offences. Read the rest of this entry »





Case Law: ABC v Google, Claimant who refused to tell the court or his opponent who he was runs out of track – Elisabeth Mason

5 12 2019

In ABC v Google LLC [2019] EWHC 3020 (QB) the High Court dismissed the latest attempt by an anonymous litigant-in-person (‘ABC’) to continue his ‘right to be forgotten’ claim against Google.  The claim concerned Google’s failure to block access to historic news reports concerning ABC (whomever he may be).  Extraordinarily, ABC pursued his claim for nearly two years without ever identifying himself either to his opponent or to the court. Read the rest of this entry »





Case Law: Orphans from Syria, Reporting Restriction Orders and Children – FC ReportingWatch

3 12 2019

Mr Justice Keehan last week published an extraordinary judgment of a mere 17 staccato paragraphs. It is called Re Orphans From Syria [2019] EWHC 3202 (Fam). It begins : Read the rest of this entry »





Justice for Grace Millane: a new Commonwealth contempt framework? – Erica Henshilwood

27 11 2019

The New Zealand Minister of Justice, Andrew Little, has called for an international judicial contempt framework to be agreed between NZ, the UK, Australia and Canada in an effort to address the (in)effectiveness of reporting restrictions in criminal trials today. Read the rest of this entry »





Reporting the Family Courts: the President’s New Clothes – FC Reporting Watch

24 11 2019

This week has seen reports in the legal press of a speech in which the President of the Family Division,  Sir Andrew McFarlane, set out an idea for a research project about news reports containing accounts of how family courts have handled domestic abuse claims. See for example : Press attacks on family courts should be assessed – McFarlane by Monidipa Fouzder in The Gazette. Here we ask : But could it work? Read the rest of this entry »





Court Reporting: President of Family Division issues new guidance on reporting the Family Courts

31 10 2019

The President of the Family Division, Sir Andrew McFarlane, has issued new Guidance as to “Reporting in the Family Courts” [pdf].  The guidance has been issued to assist the court, the parties and the media in circumstances where a reporter attending court may wish to apply to vary reporting restrictions. Read the rest of this entry »





Why we need a national commitment to open justice data – Judith Townend

13 10 2019

Justice ‘data’ – that is the information that arises from the process and administration of justice – is perhaps one of the most fundamentally important administrative data categories in public life. Read the rest of this entry »