United States: The legal basis of $170m fine on Google for YouTube’s infringement of children’s privacy – Eoin O’Dell

19 09 2019

The media was recently full of stories that Google had been “Fined $170 Million for Violating Children’s Privacy on YouTube” (that’s a headline from the New York Times; see also, for example, NPR | BBC | RTÉ | Silicon Republic). In this post, I want to sketch the legal background to, and consequences of, this fine; and, at the end, I will say a few words about the equivalent position in Europe. Read the rest of this entry »





Voice command data and privacy protection, Part II: Apple’s Siri – Suneet Sharma

13 09 2019

Apple recently released a statement on its development of automated assistant Siri’s privacy protections. The result is a move towards doing everything right in safeguarding consumer privacy. When compared to Amazon’s protections for its Alexa service market shifts and best practice become clear, making for better adherence to the seven data protection principles underpinning the GDPR. Read the rest of this entry »





Voice command data and privacy protection, Part 1: Amazon Echo’s Alexa – Suneet Sharma

12 09 2019

The increasing encroachment of audio-activated devices into our personal lives presents unique privacy challenges. Recent events have prompted the review of how audio-activated devices collect, store, transmit and use data, prompting concern and highlighting a number of long term lessons to be learned. Read the rest of this entry »





Round up of the Media Law Cases in the 2018-2019 legal year: Six libel and privacy trials – Nataly Tedone

11 09 2019

The legal year in England and Wales ended on 31 July 2019.  The High Court, the Court of Appeal and the Supreme Court are now on vacation until Michaelmas Term begins on 1 October 2019. Our Table of Media Law cases records 57 judgments in media law cases this legal year. Read the rest of this entry »





Case Law: R (Bridges) v Chief Constable of South Wales Police: The use of facial recognition software by the police is lawful –  Suneet Sharma

6 09 2019

On 4 September 2019 the Administrative Court (Haddon-Cave LJ and Swift J) handed down judgment in the case of R (Bridges) v Chief Constable of the South Wales Police [2019] EWHC 2341 (Admin).  The Court held that it was lawful for the police to use automated facial recognition software (“AFR”). Read the rest of this entry »





Facial recognition: ten reasons you should be worried about the technology – Birgit Schippers

27 08 2019

Facial recognition technology is spreading fast. Already widespread in China, software that identifies people by comparing images of their faces against a database of records is now being adopted across much of the rest of the world. It’s common among police forces but has also been used at airports, railway stations and shopping centres. Read the rest of this entry »





Silicon Valley wants to read your mind: here’s why you should be worried – Garfield Benjamin

23 08 2019

Not content with monitoring almost everything you do online, Facebook now wants to read your mind as well. The social media giant recently announced a breakthrough in its plan to create a device that reads people’s brainwaves to allow them to type just by thinking. Read the rest of this entry »





The privacy implications of using facial recognition software – Suneet Sharma

21 08 2019

The use of facial recognition software (“FRS”) in security and monitoring was thrust into the spotlight by the London Mayor Sadiq Khan, taking issue with a London developer over its installation in a King’s Cross site. Read the rest of this entry »





Here’s how tech giants profit from invading our privacy, and how we can start taking it back – Katharine Kemp

13 08 2019

Australia’s consumer watchdog has recommended major changes to consumer protection and privacy laws. If these reforms are adopted, consumers will have much more say about how we deal with Google, Facebook, and other businesses. Read the rest of this entry »





Practice Note: Media and Communications List becomes a Specialist List, new CPR 53, Practice Directions and Pre-Action Protocol

9 08 2019

In a major change to the media litigation landscape, wholly new version of CPR 53 and its Practice Directions have been published along with a new Pre-Action Protocol for all media and communication claims. Read the rest of this entry »