Coronavirus pandemic has unleashed a wave of cyber attacks: here’s how to protect yourself – Chaminda Hewage

1 04 2020

While most of the world is trying to deal with the COVID-19 pandemic, it seems hackers are not on lockdown. Cyber criminals are trying to leverage the emergency by sending out “phishing” attacks that lure internet users to click on malicious links or files. This can allow the hackers to steal sensitive data or even take control of a user’s device and use it to direct further attacks. Read the rest of this entry »





Coronavirus: South Korea’s success in controlling disease is due to its acceptance of surveillance – Jung Won Sonn

26 03 2020

South Korea has been widely praised for its management of the outbreak and spread of the coronavirus disease COVID-19. The focus has largely been on South Korea’s enormous virus testing programme. Read the rest of this entry »





Re Al M: an oasis of transparency in a desert of secrets – Athalie Matthews

18 03 2020

There was never going to be anything ordinary about a custody battle between the billionaire ruler of Dubai and a Jordanian Princess. Read the rest of this entry »





With COVID-19 containment efforts, what are the privacy rights of patients? – Hongyu Zhang

15 03 2020

As an epicenter of the COVID-19 outbreak, China has launched an unprecedented effort to control the disease, locking down Wuhan in the province of Hubei — a megacity of 11 million people. Read the rest of this entry »






Coronavirus, Media Reportage and Patient Privacy – Jelena Gligorijevic

7 03 2020

How does the law protect the privacy of individuals infected with a novel, rapidly spreading virus, against intrusive media reportage? In some common law jurisdictions, including England and Wales, and New Zealand, tort law offers some protection, and media ought to bear this in mind. In others, including Australia, such protection against intrusive media activities per se has not yet been recognised by the courts. Read the rest of this entry »





Facial recognition is spreading faster than you realise – Garfield Benjamin

1 03 2020

The UK is currently witnessing a tug of war over facial recognition. On the streets of London and in South Wales, live systems have been deployed by the police, supported by the UK government. But in the Scottish parliament, the Justice Sub-Committee on Policing is trying to halt use of the technology. Read the rest of this entry »





Case Law, Strasbourg: Beizaras and Levickas v Lithuania, A picture of a same-sex kiss on Facebook wreaks havoc – Ingrida Milkaite

19 02 2020

Two young men publicly posted a photograph of themselves kissing on Facebook. The post ‘went viral’ and attracted around 800 comments, most of which were hateful. Some of the comments featured suggestions to burn, exterminate, hang, beat, castrate, and kill the two men as well as gay people in general. Read the rest of this entry »





Why Police Investigations should not be regarded as private, Part 1 – N A Moreham

18 02 2020

The Court of Appeal will soon be hearing an appeal in ZXC v Bloomberg LP [2019] EWHC 970 (QB) in which Nicklin J joined a handful of other English judges in concluding that “in general, a person does have a reasonable expectation of privacy in a police investigation up to the point of charge” ([119]). Read the rest of this entry »





The European Data Protection Board’s Draft Guidelines for Search Engines and the Future of the ‘Right to be Forgotten’ Online, Part 2 – David Erdos

13 02 2020

This is the second part of a post dealing with the European Data Protection Board (EDPB)’s draft guidelines on the right to be forgotten.  Part (1) dealt with the scope of the guidance and of ex post rights vis-à-vis search engines.  This post will deal with (2) the substantive grounds for exercising these ex post rights, and (3) the substantive exemptions from these ex post rights. Read the rest of this entry »