The European Data Protection Board’s Draft Guidelines for Search Engines and the Future of the ‘Right to be Forgotten’ Online, Part 2 – David Erdos

13 02 2020

This is the second part of a post dealing with the European Data Protection Board (EDPB)’s draft guidelines on the right to be forgotten.  Part (1) dealt with the scope of the guidance and of ex post rights vis-à-vis search engines.  This post will deal with (2) the substantive grounds for exercising these ex post rights, and (3) the substantive exemptions from these ex post rights. Read the rest of this entry »





The European Data Protection Board’s Draft Guidelines for Search Engines and the Future of the ‘Right to be Forgotten’ Online, Part 1 – David Erdos

12 02 2020

Securing workable, balanced and effective individual rights regarding personal data disseminated online is vital to the future of data protection and should be a significant focus of attention for the European Data Protection Board going forward. Read the rest of this entry »





Protecting children online: content regulation, age verification and latest thinking on industry responsibility – Mariya Stoilva

6 02 2020

There has been rising pressure for internet regulation, both within the UK and internationally, and we have witnessed some significant developments, such as the UK government’s Online Harms White Paper, which the new government plans to action, and the publication of the Age appropriate Design Code by the Information Commissioner’s Office. Read the rest of this entry »





Let’s Get Ready to Rumble! Facial Recognition Technology and the Police – Peter Coe

1 02 2020

Just over a year ago, as a practitioner, I was involved in a number of conversations with clients and the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) relating to the use of Facial Recognition Technology (FRT). These conversations tended to be on behalf of clients operating in the leisure and health and fitness industries and related to the appropriateness of the implementation of the technology to facilitate access to their facilities. Read the rest of this entry »





Bosses using tech to spy on staff is becoming the norm, so here’s a realistic way of handling it – Douglas Bamford

31 01 2020

Workplace surveillance sounds like the stuff of nightmares, but we are having to get used to it. In a sign of the times, the European Court of Human Rights has ruled that a supermarket in Barcelona was entitled to fire employees after catching them stealing on CCTV cameras that they didn’t know were installed. This overturned a decision by the court’s lower chamber that the cameras had breached the employees’ human rights. Read the rest of this entry »





New year, new internet? Why it’s time to rethink anonymity on social media – David Babbs

31 01 2020

January 2020 sees two significant steps towards the UK improving regulation of social media companies. The government confirmed in the December Queen’s Speech that it would legislate to tackle “online harms”, and is now expected to provide some more details of how it will take this forward. Meanwhile, in the House of Lords, an Online Harm Reduction Bill was tabled on 14 January. Read the rest of this entry »





Amazon Echo’s privacy issues go way beyond voice recordings – Garfield Benjamin

29 01 2020

Amazon Echo and the Alexa voice assistant have had widely publicised issues with privacy. Whether it is the amount of data they collect or the fact that they reportedly pay employees and, at times, external contractors from all over the world to listen to recordings to improve accuracy, the potential is there for sensitive personal information to be leaked through these devices. Read the rest of this entry »





Mail on Sunday’s Meghan Markle Defence: A Study in Poverty, Part 2 – Paul Wragg

23 01 2020

The public interest defence advanced by Associated Newspapers Limited (“ANL”) comes in three different flavours, none more satisfying than the previous ones. Read the rest of this entry »





Mail on Sunday’s Meghan Markle Defence: A Study in Poverty, Part 1 – Paul Wragg

22 01 2020

Having read through the Defence which was recently filed by Associated Newspapers Ltd (“ANL”) in the case brought by Meghan Markle I was surprised to see it describe aspects of the Duchess of Sussex’s claim as ‘confused and incoherent’ (para 17) and other parts as ‘irrelevant’. Read the rest of this entry »





Interim privacy injunctions: a change in the rules to improve the recording of data – Paul Magrath

10 01 2020

In 2017 a new list was created in the Queen’s Bench Division, to be known as the Media and Communications List, and Mr Justice Warby, a media law specialist, was put in charge of it. Read the rest of this entry »