Law and Media Round Up – 18 June 2018

18 06 2018

There were two interesting statements in open court in media law cases this week.  First, on 12 June 2018 there was a statement [pdf] in the case of Wass QC v Associated Newspapers before Nicklin J. The Mail on Sunday apologised for publishing allegations that prosecuting counsel had “buried evidence” that police officers had been taking bribes.  Read the rest of this entry »





‘Upskirting’ and ‘revenge porn’: the need for a comprehensive law – Erika Rackley and Clare McGlynn

17 06 2018

File 20180615 85854 1wozlge.jpg?ixlib=rb 1.1After months of campaigning and meetings, it appears that moves to criminalise “upskirting” – the act of taking secret, sexually intrusive photographs – have stalled. For now. This is disappointing. However, all may not be lost. It is now time for the government to step up – and to eliminate inconsistencies in the treatment of victims of image-based sexual abuse. Read the rest of this entry »





France: The legal fight against ‘fake news’ must not veer into censorship – Matthew Fraser

16 06 2018

File 20180608 191981 yzu5nm.jpg?ixlib=rb 1.1France’s parliament is debating a law that would give the state the power to censor “fake news”. If the law is passed, the French state will have the powers to ban, through a court order, the publication of any news considered false in run-up period before elections. Read the rest of this entry »





The law on revelation of jury deliberations after the Thorpe trial – Alex Bailin QC

15 06 2018

In the wake of the BBC drama on the Jeremy Thorpe trial, Geoffrey Robertson QC wrote an illuminating piece about the contempt proceedings brought against the New Statesman for its interview with a Thorpe trial juror, who had explained that the jury felt obliged to acquit once the performance-related payment agreement with Bessell and The Sunday Telegraph had been revealed to them. Read the rest of this entry »





Case Law, Strasbourg: Stomakhin v Russia, No overbroad suppression of extremist opinions and ‘hate speech’ – Dirk Voorhoof

14 06 2018

In its recent judgment in Stomakhin v. Russia, the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR) launched the message to all domestic authorities to adopt a “cautious approach” in determining the scope of “hate speech” crimes and to avoid “excessive interference” with the right to freedom of expression, especially when action is taken against ‘hate speech’ or extremist opinions that are mere criticism of the government, state institutions and their policies and practices. Read the rest of this entry »





Undoing revenge … with Google’s help: Blocking revenge sites on Google – Himsworth Legal

13 06 2018

It is an unfortunate development in our digital society that there is now a tendency to publicly shame and humiliate. Nowhere is this more prevalent than in the breakdown of relationships. It would seem that, to some, revenge is a dish best served online. Read the rest of this entry »





Case: XKF v BBC, Former police officer granted injunction to restrain broadcast of interview highlighting criminal past – Tom Dane

12 06 2018

In XKF v BBC former police officer applied for relief restraining the broadcast by the respondent BBC of an interview of him recorded near his home. Read the rest of this entry »