The International Forum for Responsible Media Blog

Month: November 2018 (Page 1 of 3)

A brief introduction to the concept of privacy under English law, Part I – Suneet Sharma

Many doctrines under English law form due to common law, also known as judge-made or case law, where a series of legal cases create and form doctrines or principles which underpin legal rights. Privacy emerged as a notion in common law in the 18th century, developing through cases, until in the 20th century it became part of the European Convention on Human Rights, which was integrated into English law by the Human Rights Act 1998. In Part I we explore the early common law cases which introduced the concept of privacy to English law. Continue reading

Truth, Trust and Technology: so what’s the problem? – Sonia Livingstone

As policy makers in the UK and elsewhere consider how to tackle the spread of misinformation and the problems it causes, the LSE Truth, Trust and Technology Commission published its report last week, ‘Tackling the Information Crisis: A Policy Framework for Media System Resilience.’ Professor Sonia Livingstone, Chair of the Commission, explains here some of the problems the report seeks to address. Continue reading

Future of journalism: papers must deliver value, to readers not shareholders – Mark Bradley

The conflict that exists within the organisations that own Britain’s newspapers, and the strategies that they employ in running their businesses, was recently brought into sharp focus. One of the key regional players, Johnston Press, went from publicly-listed administration to a controversial, private rebirth within 24 hours, prompting a wider debate around the state of the industry. Continue reading

Case Law: Various Claimants v W M Morrison Supermarkets, Employer liable for data breach by employee seeking to damage it – Alex Cochrane

On 22 October 2018, the Court of Appeal dismissed the supermarket chain’s appeal in the case of Various Claimants v WM Morrison Supermarkets PLC [2018] EWCA Civ 2339, where Morrisons had been held vicariously liable at first instance for a mass data breach caused by the criminal act of a rogue employee (see our blog about that decision here). Continue reading

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