Case Law Update: Five recent media law judgments

25 04 2019

In the last week of the Hilary Legal Term, after our last weekly round up, five media law judgments were handed down.  Two by the Court of Appeal and three at first instance.  These deal with a number of important issues, particularly in the field of privacy. Read the rest of this entry »





Case Law: Ali v Channel 5, Can’t pay? Court of Appeal does not take claimants’ damages away (but neither will it increase them) – Tom Double

24 04 2019

In Ali & Anor v Channel 5 Broadcasting Ltd [2019] EWCA Civ 677, the Court of Appeal considered whether countervailing privacy and the public interest/freedom of expression rights had been properly balanced, together with the appropriate award of privacy damages arising from footage of an eviction shown on Channel 5, the Defendant in this action. Read the rest of this entry »





Case Law: Boyd v Ineos, “Persons unknown” injunctions against future protest action – Charlotte Gilmartin

23 04 2019

In Boyd & Anor v Ineos Upstream Ltd & Ors [2019] EWCA Civ 515, the Court of Appeal handed down a fascinating judgment exploring the tension between the exercise of the rights to freedom of assembly and freedom of expression and the protection of property rights. Read the rest of this entry »





What the UK’s Online Harms white paper teaches us about internet regulation – Richard Haggart and Natasha Tusikov

22 04 2019

File 20190417 139094 88004o.jpg?ixlib=rb 1.1Amidst a growing consensus that social media and online platforms must be subject to public regulation, the United Kingdom has stepped up to do just that. In doing so, it has made a lot of people very angry. Read the rest of this entry »





Inforrm: Beginning of Easter Break

21 04 2019

The Hilary Legal Term ended  last Wednesday, 17 April 2019, and the short Easter Term will not begin until Tuesday 30 April 2018. The High Court, the Court of Appeal and the Supreme Court are on “vacation” over this period and Inforrm is taking a short Easter break. Read the rest of this entry »





74 screens of legalese don’t protect your data: here’s a blueprint for new laws that could make a difference – Fred H Cate

20 04 2019

File 20190409 2912 1wuiuu0.jpg?ixlib=rb 1.1All over the world, government officials are trying to figure out how to craft laws and regulations about privacy – especially for digital data and online activity. The European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation took effect in May 2018; about a month later, California’s new Consumer Privacy Act did too. Both impose stringent new legal requirements on organizations that collect and use personal data. Read the rest of this entry »





Google vs. Equustek: Unfortunate Precedent or Positive Development? – Hugh Stephens

19 04 2019

I have written about the case of Google Inc vs Equustek Solutions several times over the past couple of years (for example, herehere, and here). This series of blog posts tracked the evolution of the case. Read the rest of this entry »





The White Paper on Online Harms. Keep in mind the bigger picture – Damian Tambini

18 04 2019

Protests that the government proposals for a duty of care on social media  are a threat to free speech appear to be missing the point. European standards on freedom of expression give states ample justification for regulating speech that is harmful or undermines national security – if regulations are proportionate, prescribed by law and pursue a legitimate aim. Read the rest of this entry »





Byline Times: a new approach to journalism? – Paul Magrath

17 04 2019

Having been developed as an online journal, Byline Times has now launched itself into the physical newspaper world with a special Brexit Edition. They say: Read the rest of this entry »





Geoffrey Rush’s victory in his defamation case could have a chilling effect on the #MeToo movement – Karen O’Connell

16 04 2019

The decision in Geoffrey Rush v Nationwide News, handed down today in Australia’s federal court, is the first – and so far, only – legal determination of a case associated with the #MeToo movement in Australia. Read the rest of this entry »