Users Behaving Badly: the Online Harms White Paper – Graham Smith

30 04 2019

On 8 April 2019, having spent the best part of a day reading the UK government’s Online Harms White Paper, I concluded that if the road to hell was paved with good intentions, this was a motorway. After full and further consideration, I have found nothing to alter that view. This is why. Read the rest of this entry »





Practice Update: New rules on Hearings and the Publication of Orders for Anonymity and Private Hearings – Aidan Wills

29 04 2019

On 6 April 2019 an amended version of the rule governing hearings, CPR 39, came into force. The changes are intended to reinforce the principles of open justice.  The changes follow a consultation conducted by the Ministry of Justice in 2018. Read the rest of this entry »





How UK journalists compare with their German counterparts: new research – Neil Thurman and Imke Henkel

28 04 2019

File 20190424 19303 17t67jq.jpg?ixlib=rb 1.1The British press is regarded by the rest of the world as notoriously raucous. If you need an example of how raucous, the way British newspapers have reported Brexit is only one recent, if much-discussed, example. Read the rest of this entry »





Online harms proposals represent the start of the journey – David Barker and Alex Keenlyside

27 04 2019

Last week the UK government published its white paper on online harms. The proposals are focused on what internet companies should do to help address what is an important and complex issue, and they should be viewed as the start of the journey rather than the destination. Read the rest of this entry »





Migrants and the media: what shapes the narratives on immigration in different countries – Rob McNeil

26 04 2019

File 20190426 194609 sjhjyi.png?ixlib=rb 1.1If you want to spoil a movie for yourself, wait for a nice dramatic moment and then imagine what it was like to shoot it: the cameras, sound and lighting crews all around; the portable toilets round the back; the half-finished bowl of crisps on the catering table. If a film is to succeed, it needs us to suspend our disbelief and not think about the process. Read the rest of this entry »





Case Law Update: Five recent media law judgments

25 04 2019

In the last week of the Hilary Legal Term, after our last weekly round up, five media law judgments were handed down.  Two by the Court of Appeal and three at first instance.  These deal with a number of important issues, particularly in the field of privacy. Read the rest of this entry »





Case Law: Ali v Channel 5, Can’t pay? Court of Appeal does not take claimants’ damages away (but neither will it increase them) – Tom Double

24 04 2019

In Ali & Anor v Channel 5 Broadcasting Ltd [2019] EWCA Civ 677, the Court of Appeal considered whether countervailing privacy and the public interest/freedom of expression rights had been properly balanced, together with the appropriate award of privacy damages arising from footage of an eviction shown on Channel 5, the Defendant in this action. Read the rest of this entry »





Case Law: Boyd v Ineos, “Persons unknown” injunctions against future protest action – Charlotte Gilmartin

23 04 2019

In Boyd & Anor v Ineos Upstream Ltd & Ors [2019] EWCA Civ 515, the Court of Appeal handed down a fascinating judgment exploring the tension between the exercise of the rights to freedom of assembly and freedom of expression and the protection of property rights. Read the rest of this entry »





What the UK’s Online Harms white paper teaches us about internet regulation – Richard Haggart and Natasha Tusikov

22 04 2019

File 20190417 139094 88004o.jpg?ixlib=rb 1.1Amidst a growing consensus that social media and online platforms must be subject to public regulation, the United Kingdom has stepped up to do just that. In doing so, it has made a lot of people very angry. Read the rest of this entry »





Inforrm: Beginning of Easter Break

21 04 2019

The Hilary Legal Term ended  last Wednesday, 17 April 2019, and the short Easter Term will not begin until Tuesday 30 April 2018. The High Court, the Court of Appeal and the Supreme Court are on “vacation” over this period and Inforrm is taking a short Easter break. Read the rest of this entry »