Case Law, South Africa: amaBhungane Centre v Minister of Justice, Landmark ruling impresses even ultimate whistle-blower Edward Snowden – Dario Milo

21 09 2019

The South African High Court judgment in the case of amaBhungane Centre for Investigative Journalism  v Minister of Justice and Correctional Services [2019] ZAGPPHC 384 is a victory for privacy rights. Read the rest of this entry »





Facial recognition: ten reasons you should be worried about the technology – Birgit Schippers

27 08 2019

Facial recognition technology is spreading fast. Already widespread in China, software that identifies people by comparing images of their faces against a database of records is now being adopted across much of the rest of the world. It’s common among police forces but has also been used at airports, railway stations and shopping centres. Read the rest of this entry »





The Great Hack and the dysaguria of Cambridge Analytica – Eoin O’Dell

28 07 2019

The Great Hack has just dropped on Netflix (IMDB | Rotten Tomatoes | wikipedia | poster left). It is a documentary that explores “how a data company named Cambridge Analytica came to symbolize the dark side of social media in the wake of the 2016 US presidential election”. Read the rest of this entry »





U.K. proposal to ‘Bcc’ law enforcement on messaging apps threatens global privacy – Paulo Garcia

6 07 2019

The term “ghost protocol” might remind you of a famous blockbuster starring Tom Cruise, but here it applies to a new proposal by the Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ) in the United Kingdom. Read the rest of this entry »





Surveillance cameras will soon be unrecognisable: time for an urgent public conversation – William Webster

19 06 2019

It is often argued that the UK is the most surveilled country on the planet. This may or may not have been the case in the past but there are certainly now millions of surveillance cameras in public spaces – not to mention private buildings and homes. Read the rest of this entry »





How governments use Big Data to violate human rights – Andrew Thompson

20 01 2019

The right to privacy has become a pressing human rights issue. And rightly so. Big data — combined with artificial intelligence and facial recognition software — has the capacity to intrude on people’s lives in unprecedented ways, in some cases on a massive scale. Read the rest of this entry »





Internet legal developments to look out for in 2019 – Graham Smith

29 12 2018

A bumper crop of pending litigation and legislative initiatives for the coming year (without even thinking about Brexit). Read the rest of this entry »





Proposed police super-database breaks the law and has no legal basis, but the Home Office doesn’t care – Matthew White

19 10 2018

The announcement from human rights organisation Liberty that it would boycott the UK Home Office’s consultation on the Law Enforcement Data Service, a new super-database for the police, is an indication of how far from acceptable the project is. Read the rest of this entry »





Big Brother Watch v UK: What are the implications for the Investigatory Powers Act? – Graham Smith

14 09 2018

Yesterday I was transported back in time, to that surreal period following the Snowden revelations in 2013 when anyone who knew anything about the previously obscure RIPA (Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000) was in demand to explain how it was that GCHQ was empowered to conduct bulk interception on a previously unimagined scale. Read the rest of this entry »





Any reform to the law on Official Secrets must provide robust protection for public interest disclosures and open justice – Lorna Woods, Lawrence McNamara and Judith Townend

28 06 2017

With the election now in the past, the wheels of government are beginning to grind again. While most eyes are on Brussels, it is important that the bright lights of Brexit do not draw attention away from other work that is resuming and ongoing. Among it, the Law Commission will continue its project that considers the revision of the laws on Official Secrets, with its final proposals expected later this year. Read the rest of this entry »