When Privacy and Security Collide: the legality of using facial recognition security systems in quasi-public spaces – Raghav Mendiratta

5 06 2020

New technologies present opportunities for the private security sector to innovate and gain an edge over slower and non-adapter competitors. Law enforcement agencies around the world have started using facial recognition techniques over the last few years. Read the rest of this entry »





The coronavirus pandemic highlights the need for a surveillance debate beyond ‘privacy’ – David Lyon

31 05 2020

The coronavirus pandemic has stirred up a surveillance storm. Researchers rush to develop new forms of public health monitoring and tracking, but releasing personal data to private companies and governments carries risks to our individual and collective rights. COVID-19 opens the lid on a much-needed debate. Read the rest of this entry »





Coronavirus contact tracing apps: a proportionate response? – Robin Mansell

2 05 2020

It seems likely that a decision will be taken soon in the UK to use a smartphone (Bluetooth) based contact tracing app to help stem the COVID-19 pandemic, with a trial reported on 22 April. Used with other measures including scaled-up testing for infection, physical distancing and self-isolation, this is expected to help save lives. Read the rest of this entry »





Coronavirus: South Korea’s success in controlling disease is due to its acceptance of surveillance – Jung Won Sonn

26 03 2020

South Korea has been widely praised for its management of the outbreak and spread of the coronavirus disease COVID-19. The focus has largely been on South Korea’s enormous virus testing programme. Read the rest of this entry »





Let’s Get Ready to Rumble! Facial Recognition Technology and the Police – Peter Coe

1 02 2020

Just over a year ago, as a practitioner, I was involved in a number of conversations with clients and the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) relating to the use of Facial Recognition Technology (FRT). These conversations tended to be on behalf of clients operating in the leisure and health and fitness industries and related to the appropriateness of the implementation of the technology to facilitate access to their facilities. Read the rest of this entry »





The European Court of Human Rights and the right to privacy in the workplace, Bărbulescu and Lopez Ribalda – Peter Coe

15 11 2019

In November I will be Chairing a panel on Data Rights and the Rule of Law at the Information Law and Policy Centre’s Annual Conference at the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies. This got me thinking about data protection, privacy and the Rule of Law more generally. Read the rest of this entry »





Case Law, South Africa: amaBhungane Centre v Minister of Justice, Landmark ruling impresses even ultimate whistle-blower Edward Snowden – Dario Milo

21 09 2019

The South African High Court judgment in the case of amaBhungane Centre for Investigative Journalism  v Minister of Justice and Correctional Services [2019] ZAGPPHC 384 is a victory for privacy rights. Read the rest of this entry »





Facial recognition: ten reasons you should be worried about the technology – Birgit Schippers

27 08 2019

Facial recognition technology is spreading fast. Already widespread in China, software that identifies people by comparing images of their faces against a database of records is now being adopted across much of the rest of the world. It’s common among police forces but has also been used at airports, railway stations and shopping centres. Read the rest of this entry »





The Great Hack and the dysaguria of Cambridge Analytica – Eoin O’Dell

28 07 2019

The Great Hack has just dropped on Netflix (IMDB | Rotten Tomatoes | wikipedia | poster left). It is a documentary that explores “how a data company named Cambridge Analytica came to symbolize the dark side of social media in the wake of the 2016 US presidential election”. Read the rest of this entry »





U.K. proposal to ‘Bcc’ law enforcement on messaging apps threatens global privacy – Paulo Garcia

6 07 2019

The term “ghost protocol” might remind you of a famous blockbuster starring Tom Cruise, but here it applies to a new proposal by the Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ) in the United Kingdom. Read the rest of this entry »