Time to rethink truth and trust – Sonia Livingstone

16 10 2018

The LSE Truth, Trust and Technology Commission (T3) deals with the crisis in public information – aka “fake news”, Cambridge Analytica, election hacking, the crisis in journalism, filter bubbles, biased algorithms, ill-informed citizens and more. Read the rest of this entry »





Case Law: Lloyd v Google, No compensation for Google data breaches – Rosalind English

13 10 2018

Most of us resignedly consent to the use of cookies in order to use internet sites, vaguely aware that these collect information about our browsing habits in order to target us with advertisements. It’s annoying, but does it do us any harm? That is the question that came up before Warby J in a preliminary application for a representative claim in the case of Lloyd v Google LLC [2018] EWHC 2599 (QB). Read the rest of this entry »





Anticipatory regulation: a way forward for platform governance? – Jelena Dzakula

12 10 2018

A wide consensus has emerged that regulatory framework for platforms like Google and Facebook needs to change. Calls for action are coming from a range of different stakeholders in the UK, with proposed solutions varying in terms of models of regulation, and who should implement them. Read the rest of this entry »





A Lord Chamberlain for the internet? Thanks, but no thanks – Graham Smith

10 10 2018

This summer marked the fiftieth anniversary of the Theatres Act 1968, the legislation that freed the theatres from the censorious hand of the Lord Chamberlain of Her Majesty’s Household. Thereafter theatres needed to concern themselves only with the general laws governing speech. In addition they were granted a public good defence to obscenity and immunity from common law offences against public morality. Read the rest of this entry »





Regulate social media? It’s a bit more complicated than that – Sara Solmone

3 10 2018

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Free speech is a key aspect of the internet, but it has become increasingly obvious that many online will push that freedom to extremes, leaving website comment sections, Twitter feeds and Facebook groups awash with racist, sexist, homophobic or otherwise unpalatable opinions and vitriolic views, and obscene or shocking images or videos. Read the rest of this entry »





Regulating online platforms for misinformation and disinformation – Mark Bunting

2 10 2018

How to deal with misinformation is a topic of significant debate in the UK, and a focus of the LSE Commission on Truth, Trust and Technology, which will launch its report in November. The Commons Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Select Committee has released its interim report from its inquiry into fake news, and is likely to publish its final report in the coming months. Read the rest of this entry »





Book Review: Anti-social media: How Facebook Disconnects Us and Undermines Democracy – Oscar Davies

27 09 2018

In his new book, Anti-Social Media: How Facebook Disconnects Us and Undermines Democracy Siva Vaidhyanathan lays out why Facebook may be good for some people, but not good for democracy as a whole.

The book is divided into sections delineating the ways in which we can look at  Facebook: as a pleasure machine, a surveillance machine, an attention machine, a benevolence machine, a protest machine, a politics machine or a disinformation machine. Read the rest of this entry »