Systemic Duties of Care and Intermediary Liability – Daphne Keller

5 06 2020

Policymakers in Europe and around the world are currently pursuing two reasonable-sounding goals for platform regulation. First, they want platforms to abide by a “duty of care,” going beyond today’s notice-and-takedown based legal models to more proactively weed out illegal content posted by users. Read the rest of this entry »





Donald Trump’s attacks on social media threaten the free speech rights of all Americans – Eliza Bechtold

2 06 2020

Given that US president Donald Trump appears to use Twitter almost instinctively, his recent attacks on the platform may seem counterintuitive. But his feud with Twitter is another example of the ways in which the president has routinely distorted the principles of the First Amendment in order to undermine the very freedoms he claims to be championing – as well as American democracy more broadly. Read the rest of this entry »





Trump’s Twitter tantrum may wreck the internet – Michael Douglas

29 05 2020

US President Donald Trump, who tweeted more than 11,000 times in the first two years of his presidency, is very upset with Twitter. Earlier this week Trump tweeted complaints about mail-in ballots, alleging voter fraud – a familiar Trump falsehood. Read the rest of this entry »





Online Harms White Paper: A Tale of Two Committees, Part 2 – Graham Smith

29 05 2020

This is Part 2 of a post dealing with evidence given by government Ministers to two Commons Committees – the Home Affairs Committee and the Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee – discussing, among other things, the government’s proposed Online Harms legislation. Part 1 was published on 28 May 2020. Read the rest of this entry »





Online Harms White Paper: A Tale of Two Committees, Part 1 – Graham Smith

28 05 2020

Two Commons Committees – the Home Affairs Committee and the Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee – have recently held evidence sessions with government Ministers discussing, among other things, the government’s proposed Online Harms legislation. These sessions proved to be as revealing, if not more so, about the government’s intentions as its February 2020 Initial Response to the White Paper. Read the rest of this entry »





Fact checking in the time of COVID-19 – Pierre Andrews

26 04 2020

The COVID-19 pandemic not only represents a challenge for researchers and policymakers in the fields of medicine, international relations and economics, but also in media and communications. Read the rest of this entry »





Holding Google to Account: France Takes a Stand – Hugh Stephens

22 04 2020

The French Competition Bureau (l’Autorité de la Concurrence) struck a strong blow in the global effort to hold Google to account under national laws when it issued an order on April 9 requiring Google to negotiate with French press publishers and news providers regarding licensing fees for news content appearing in Google search listings in France. Read the rest of this entry »





Strasbourg’s subtle approach of online media platforms’ liability for user-generated content since the ‘Delfi Oracle’ – Dirk Voorhoof

14 04 2020

On 18 June 2015, Strasbourg Observers published my blog post ‘Delfi AS v. Estonia: Grand Chamber confirms liability of online news portal for offensive comments posted by its readers’. The post appeared on Inforrm the following day. Read the rest of this entry »





Social media fuels wave of coronavirus misinformation as users focus on popularity, not accuracy – Jon-Patrick Allem

8 04 2020

Over the past few weeks, misinformation about the new coronavirus pandemic has been spreading across social media at an alarming rate. One video that went viral claimed breathing hot air from a hair dryer could treat COVID-19. Read the rest of this entry »





Twitter Cannot Keep Hiding Behind Blanket Anonymity – Stephen Kinsella

7 04 2020

The use of anonymous Twitter accounts was considered by a committee in the House of Lords last week, which examined how the social media giant’s “practices and policies affect UK democracy”. Read the rest of this entry »