IPSO Committee betrays its absolute lack of independence via its front-page policy – Jonathan Coad

15 08 2018

In a recent adjudication of a complaint about an errant front-page story published by the Daily Mail misreporting a court award of compensation to a victim of unlawful imprisonment and ill treatment by British armed forces, IPSO has set out its rationale for effectively ruling out the correction of front-page articles via the front page.  Read the rest of this entry »





Reputation beyond Defamation – David Rolph

13 08 2018

The common law has long protected reputation very highly. The principal means by which it has done this is the tort of defamation. Justice Hallett in Foaminol Laboratories Ltd v British Artid Plastics Ltd ([1941] 2 All ER 393) famously remarked that “a claim for mere loss of reputation is the proper subject of an action for defamation and cannot ordinarily be sustained by means of any other form of action”. Read the rest of this entry »





Clearing your name: the devil is in the detail – Alistair Parker

11 08 2018

Statistically, most people charged with criminal offences are guilty as charged. In fact, the vast majority either plead ‘guilty’ of their own volition, or are found guilty at trial and are sentenced. Quite apart from the sentencing, there are rules about how long those convictions remain ‘live’ (meaning they must be disclosed to potential employers). Read the rest of this entry »





Case Law, Australia: Pahuja v TCN Channel Nine, Channel Nine’s “disgraceful” story, $300,000 damages – Justin Castelan

10 08 2018

Sunil Pahuja migrated to Australia at 27, did a Masters in accounting and developed a business installing solar panels. He knew many people in the Indian community and was to become the perfect example of a person who was in the wrong place at the wrong time. Read the rest of this entry »





Libel Injunctions: Time to revisit the rule in Bonnard v Perryman? – Helena Shipman

8 08 2018

The interim defamation injunction has long been considered a rare breed; indeed it has been 127 years since the common law rule in Bonnard v Perryman [1891] 2 Ch 269 was first established, preventing claimants from obtaining interim libel injunctions in all but the most exceptional circumstances. Read the rest of this entry »





Consultation on Open Justice: Proposed Changes to CPR Part 39

7 08 2018

The Ministry of Justice is consulting on proposed changes to CPR Part 39 “Miscellaneous Provisions relating to Hearings”.  The consultation opened on 12 July 2018 and closes on 23 August 2018.  Responses can be by completion of an Online Survey. Read the rest of this entry »





Inforrm is taking a Summer Break

6 08 2018

The 2017-2018 legal year in England and Wales ended last week. The Inforrm blog is now taking a summer break until the end of September. We thank all our readers and contributors who have supported us over the past year. Posting will continue over the summer but will not be as regular as usual.  Read the rest of this entry »