The COVID-19 Pandemic, the Media and the Law – Call for Submissions

1 04 2020

The Media & Arts Law Review is seeking submissions for Special Issue 24(2). The theme of this Special Issue is ‘The COVID-19 Pandemic, the Media and the Law’. The COVID-19 pandemic is a once-in-a-generation event. It is already having a significant impact on all aspects of Australian society, including the legal system. Read the rest of this entry »





Monthly International Round Up – Suneet Sharma

24 03 2020

This is the fourth instalment in a regular new series from Inforrm highlighting press and case reports of new media and information cases from around the world.  It is intended to complement our United States: Monthly Round Up posts.  Please let us know if there are other cases and jurisdictions which we should be covering. Read the rest of this entry »





Monthly International Round Up – Suneet Sharma

27 02 2020

This is the third instalment in a regular new series from Inforrm highlighting press and case reports of new media and information cases from around the world.  It is intended to complement our United States: Monthly Round Up posts.  Please let us know if there are other cases and jurisdictions which we should be covering. Read the rest of this entry »





Australian law says the media can’t spin lies: ‘entertainment magazines’ aren’t an exception – Andrew Dodd

25 02 2020

In a recent ruling the Australian Press Council has given a signal to gossip magazines it is OK to make up and publish rubbish about people, so long as the stories aren’t “blatantly incorrect”. Read the rest of this entry »





Case Law, Australia: Tsamis v State of Victoria, Inflation night-club owner wins $90,000 for police slur – Justin Castelan

21 02 2020

Martha Tsamis has worked in the nightclub industry for around 30 years and is the manager of the Inflation night-club in Melbourne. In October 2013, the police brought an application to restrict Inflation’s trading hours (LCRA proceeding). The evidence was that the police brought this in an attempt to reduce the incidence of drug overdoses, improve community safety and give people confidence that ‘licensed premises’ were not ‘drug dens’. The statement in the police application referred to 59 incidents that occurred at the venue. Read the rest of this entry »





Case Law, Australia: Wagner v Nine Network Australia PL, 60 Minutes indefensible defamation: $4 more million for the Wagner family – Justin Castelan

29 12 2019

Denis, John, Neill and Joe Wagner operated a quarry in Grantham in Queensland. In January 2011, there was a flood that devastated the town and killed 12 people. A Commission of Inquiry made findings that the disaster was a natural event and no human action caused it or could have prevented it – not much of a story, so the media persisted. Read the rest of this entry »





Monthly International Law and Media Round Up – Suneet Sharma

11 12 2019

This is the first instalment in a regular new series from Inforrm highlighting press and case reports of new media and information cases from around the world.  It is intended to complement our United States: Monthly Round Up posts.  Please let us know if there are other cases and jurisdictions which we should be covering. Read the rest of this entry »





Australia’s proposed defamation law overhaul will expand media freedom: but at what cost? – Michael Douglas

7 12 2019

On 29 November 2019, Australia’s attorneys-general agreed on proposed amendments to the provisions which underpin Australian defamation laws. This means Australian governments have a plan for how to change defamation law. Read the rest of this entry »





Australia: The ugly truth: tech companies are tracking and misusing our data, and there’s little we can do – Suranga Seneviratne

30 11 2019

As survey results pile, it’s becoming clear Australians are sceptical about how their online data is tracked and used. But one question worth asking is: are our fears founded? The short answer is: yes. Read the rest of this entry »





Australia: A push to make social media companies liable in defamation is great for newspapers and lawyers, but not you – Michael Douglas

28 11 2019

At his Wednesday 20 November 2019 address to the National Press Club, Attorney-General Christian Porter said the federal government is pursuing “immediate” defamation law reform. The announcement seemed a bit odd, as defamation is a subject for state and territory governments to legislate on. A NSW-led law reform process has been ongoing for years. Read the rest of this entry »