Case Law, Australia: Wagner v Nine Network Australia PL, 60 Minutes indefensible defamation: $4 more million for the Wagner family – Justin Castelan

29 12 2019

Denis, John, Neill and Joe Wagner operated a quarry in Grantham in Queensland. In January 2011, there was a flood that devastated the town and killed 12 people. A Commission of Inquiry made findings that the disaster was a natural event and no human action caused it or could have prevented it – not much of a story, so the media persisted. Read the rest of this entry »





Monthly International Law and Media Round Up – Suneet Sharma

11 12 2019

This is the first instalment in a regular new series from Inforrm highlighting press and case reports of new media and information cases from around the world.  It is intended to complement our United States: Monthly Round Up posts.  Please let us know if there are other cases and jurisdictions which we should be covering. Read the rest of this entry »





Australia’s proposed defamation law overhaul will expand media freedom: but at what cost? – Michael Douglas

7 12 2019

On 29 November 2019, Australia’s attorneys-general agreed on proposed amendments to the provisions which underpin Australian defamation laws. This means Australian governments have a plan for how to change defamation law. Read the rest of this entry »





Australia: The ugly truth: tech companies are tracking and misusing our data, and there’s little we can do – Suranga Seneviratne

30 11 2019

As survey results pile, it’s becoming clear Australians are sceptical about how their online data is tracked and used. But one question worth asking is: are our fears founded? The short answer is: yes. Read the rest of this entry »





Australia: A push to make social media companies liable in defamation is great for newspapers and lawyers, but not you – Michael Douglas

28 11 2019

At his Wednesday 20 November 2019 address to the National Press Club, Attorney-General Christian Porter said the federal government is pursuing “immediate” defamation law reform. The announcement seemed a bit odd, as defamation is a subject for state and territory governments to legislate on. A NSW-led law reform process has been ongoing for years. Read the rest of this entry »





Why the Duchess of Sussex is justified in suing the “Mail on Sunday” – Stuart Gibson

17 11 2019

There’s nothing quite like a Royal Lawsuit to get the English media and for that matter English lawyers’ tails wagging. London Legal has been abuzz over the last week since word got out that the Duchess of Sussex had begun legal action against The Mail on Sunday over a claim that it unlawfully published a private handwritten letter of hers to her father Thomas Markle. Read the rest of this entry »





Australia needs a Media Freedom Act. Here’s how it could work – Rebecca Ananian-Welsh

23 10 2019

Australians picked up their morning papers yesterday to find heavily blacked-out text instead of front-page headlines. This bold statement was instigated by the “Your Right to Know” campaign, an unlikely coalition of Australian media organisations fighting for press freedom and source protection. Read the rest of this entry »





Here’s how tech giants profit from invading our privacy, and how we can start taking it back – Katharine Kemp

13 08 2019

Australia’s consumer watchdog has recommended major changes to consumer protection and privacy laws. If these reforms are adopted, consumers will have much more say about how we deal with Google, Facebook, and other businesses. Read the rest of this entry »





Australia: Will the High Court ruling on public servant’s tweets have a ‘powerful chill’ on free speech? – Anthony Forsyth

10 08 2019

The Israel Folau termination case has dominated headlines for months now. Many Australians have been intrigued by the extent to which employers like Rugby Australia are able to control the social media activity of their employees – in Folau’s case, a high-profile player who tweeted his condemnation of homosexuals and others. Read the rest of this entry »





After defamation ruling, it’s time Facebook provided better moderation tools – Fiona R Martin

2 07 2019

After a NSW Supreme court judge ruled last week that Australian publishers are liable for defamatory comments on their Facebook sites, it’s clear that page owners need to get serious about social media management. Read the rest of this entry »