Here’s how tech giants profit from invading our privacy, and how we can start taking it back – Katharine Kemp

13 08 2019

Australia’s consumer watchdog has recommended major changes to consumer protection and privacy laws. If these reforms are adopted, consumers will have much more say about how we deal with Google, Facebook, and other businesses. Read the rest of this entry »





Australia: Will the High Court ruling on public servant’s tweets have a ‘powerful chill’ on free speech? – Anthony Forsyth

10 08 2019

The Israel Folau termination case has dominated headlines for months now. Many Australians have been intrigued by the extent to which employers like Rugby Australia are able to control the social media activity of their employees – in Folau’s case, a high-profile player who tweeted his condemnation of homosexuals and others. Read the rest of this entry »





After defamation ruling, it’s time Facebook provided better moderation tools – Fiona R Martin

2 07 2019

After a NSW Supreme court judge ruled last week that Australian publishers are liable for defamatory comments on their Facebook sites, it’s clear that page owners need to get serious about social media management. Read the rest of this entry »





Can you be liable for defamation for what other people write on your Facebook page? Australian court says: maybe – Michael Douglas

27 06 2019

When you go online and write something nasty about a person, or even a small business, you risk being sued for defamation.mBut if someone else goes online and writes something nasty about a person on your social media page, can you be held liable even though you didn’t write it? Depending on who you are: maybe. Read the rest of this entry »





Australia: Four laws that need urgent reform to protect both national security and press freedom – Denis Muller

21 06 2019

In a perfect world, Australia would introduce constitutional protections for freedom of the press. But since the chances of that are next to zero, it might be more productive to look instead at what might be done to make the existing web of secrecy laws less repressive. Read the rest of this entry »





Australia: To protect press freedom, we need more public outrage, and an overhaul of our laws – Peter Greste

9 06 2019

A few days ago, Waleed Aly asked a not-so-rhetorical question in The Sydney Morning Herald. He wondered how many Australians were worried about the fact that the Australian Federal Police had spent a good portion of last week raiding the offices and homes of journalists who’ve published stories clearly in the public interest. Read the rest of this entry »





Press, platforms and power: mapping out a stronger Australian media landscape – Tim Dwyer and Timothy Koskie,

7 06 2019

In his first address to the caucus after Labor’s shock election loss, Bill Shorten pointed to conservative interests “spending unprecedented hundreds of millions of dollars advertising, telling lies, spreading fear … Powerful vested interests campaigned against us through sections of the media itself, and they got what they wanted”. Read the rest of this entry »





Case Law, Australia: Raynor v Murray, Torrid times at the Watermark flats – Gabrielle Hunter

4 06 2019

In the case of Raynor v Murray ([2019] NSWDC 189) the District Court of NSW ordered Patricia Murray, a tenant of Manly residential flats known as “Watermark”, to pay damages of $120,000 to the chairman of the building’s strata committee for a defamatory email regarding an unlocked mailbox. Read the rest of this entry »





Case Law, Australia: Chau v Fairfax Media Publications PL, Philanthropist Wins Round One – Justin Castelan

4 05 2019

Dr Chau Chak Wing is a wealthy Chinese-born Australian citizen. He has extensive business interests in China and is a very generous philanthropist. He has donated enormous sums of money to a number of universities and public institutions in Australia, as well as having made donations to the main political parties in Australia. Read the rest of this entry »





Geoffrey Rush’s victory in his defamation case could have a chilling effect on the #MeToo movement – Karen O’Connell

16 04 2019

The decision in Geoffrey Rush v Nationwide News, handed down today in Australia’s federal court, is the first – and so far, only – legal determination of a case associated with the #MeToo movement in Australia. Read the rest of this entry »