Legal bloggers reporting the family courts: a level playing field? – Lucy Reed

21 11 2017

In August THAT Muslim foster carer story hit the press (‘Christian child forced into foster care’, The Times, 28 August 2017). The Times journalist Andrew Norfolk, lauded for his expose of the Rotherham child sexual abuse scandal, was the subject of trenchant criticism for what was widely perceived as anti-Islamic coverage of a case involving a white Christian child placed with (it was said) Muslim foster carers who did not speak English and who withheld a crucifix and spaghetti carbonara from the child. Read the rest of this entry »






“Murderers”: of myths, Macpherson and the Daily Mail – Brian Cathcart

4 11 2017

As we approach the 25th anniversary of Stephen Lawrence’s murder, it’s time to critically assess whether the Daily Mail really played the pivotal and progressive role it likes to claim in the case, and its impact on Britain’s race relations. Read the rest of this entry »





Can new models of public interest journalism survive? – Robert Cribb

22 10 2017

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Over the past year, 34 students at four Canadian journalism schools — Concordia, Ryerson, Regina and the University of British Columbia — joined together with senior journalists at three national news organizations — the Toronto Star, Global News and the National Observer — in an unprecedented reporting collaboration. Read the rest of this entry »





The muslim foster carer case again: what else has emerged? – Family Courts Reporting Watch

11 10 2017

We have covered the case originally headlined “Christian child forced into foster care” on a number of occasions. Our earlier posts can be found here : Read the rest of this entry »





Australia: Whose interests? Why defining the ‘public interest’ is such a challenge – Jane Johnston

22 09 2017
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The “public interest” is a political concept that’s regularly trotted out along with other democratic principles such as transparency and accountability. And, like transparency and accountability, it’s difficult to pin down exactly what it means. Read the rest of this entry »





How PR giant Bell Pottinger made itself look bad – Paula Keaveney

7 09 2017
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The reputation of global PR company Bell Pottinger has suffered a massive blow. The boss has resigned, clients have walked, the firm has been expelled from the Public Relations and Communications Association (PRCA) – and it has now put itself up for sale. All because of its work on a controversial contract in South Africa. Read the rest of this entry »