Canada: v Goldhar: Supreme Court set to pronounce on forum and jurisdiction in Internet libel claim – Natasha Holcroft-Emmess

14 02 2018

In et al v Mitchell Goldhar (SCC case no. 37202), the Supreme Court of Canada is asked to decide whether the court in Ontario has jurisdiction to hear a defamation claim arising from an article widely published in Israel, but read online by a number of people in Canada. Read the rest of this entry »

Canada: Why governments must not block social media criticism – Justin Safayeni and Andrea Gonsalves

15 12 2017

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In the digital era, politicians and government agencies frequently find themselves the target of criticism on social media. There have been some startling news stories this year of public authorities blocking users or deleting unwelcome posts on social media sites, effectively silencing dissenting views in popular online forums. Read the rest of this entry »

Are we asking too much from defamation law? Reputation systems, ADR, Industry Regulation and other Extra-Judicial Possibilities for Protecting Reputation in the Internet Age: Proposal for Reform – Emily Laidlaw

22 11 2017

In an earlier post, Hilary Young and I outlined our proposal to the Law Commission of Ontario (LCO) for reform of intermediary liability and the meaning of publication in defamation law. Read the rest of this entry »

Can new models of public interest journalism survive? – Robert Cribb

22 10 2017

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Over the past year, 34 students at four Canadian journalism schools — Concordia, Ryerson, Regina and the University of British Columbia — joined together with senior journalists at three national news organizations — the Toronto Star, Global News and the National Observer — in an unprecedented reporting collaboration. Read the rest of this entry »

Google’s US Challenge to the Canadian Global Delisting Order – Daphne Keller

9 08 2017

In its Equustek ruling in June, the Canadian Supreme Court held that Google must delete search results for users everywhere in the world, based on Canadian law. Google has now filed suit in the US, asking the court to confirm that the order can’t be enforced there. Here’s my take on that claim. Read the rest of this entry »

The real consequences of fake news – Dominik Stecula

29 07 2017

Fake news, or fabricated content deceptively presented as real news, has garnered a lot of interest since the U.S. presidential election last year. Although hardly a new phenomenon, the global nature of the web-based information environment allows purveyors of all sorts of falsehoods and misinformation to make an international impact. Read the rest of this entry »

Worldwide search de-indexing orders: Google v Equustek – Graham Smith

26 07 2017

The Supreme Court of Canada has issued its decision in Google Inc v Equustek (2017 SCC 34). This is the case in which a small Canadian technology company, Equustek, asked the Canadian courts to grant an injunction against the well-known US search engine ordering it to de-index specified websites – not just on its Canadian domain, but on a worldwide basis. Read the rest of this entry »