The International Forum for Responsible Media Blog

Month: May 2019 (Page 1 of 4)

What we know about how political parties use Facebook advertising and what we don’t – Katharine Dommett and Sam Power

Over the past five years, Facebook has exploded as a site for political advertising and election campaigning. Donald Trump, Jeremy Corbyn and Angela Merkel have all used it to promote their ideas. Yet despite the increasing prominence of Facebook, we currently know very little about how much political parties actually spend on the platform. Continue reading

The Jeremy Kyle affair: Four things you need to know – Trevor Barnes and Meriem Anou

ITV‘s decision to permanently suspend the production of The Jeremy Kyle Show is making headlines. However, this should not come as a surprise given recent controversies surrounding duty of care issues in reality television programmes. Ofcom and MPs must tread very carefully in proposing new duty of care obligations on broadcasters to look after adult contributors. Continue reading

GDPR: The digital age of consent, one year on – Alex Cooney

This Saturday, 25 May, will be the one year anniversary of Europe’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) coming into force. Alex Cooney, CEO of CyberSafeIreland, a non-profit working to empower children, parents and teachers to navigate the online world in a safe and responsible manner, discusses the impact of the regulation on children, particularly the GDPR’s requirement for a digital age of consent. Continue reading

Case Law: R (Privacy International) v Investigatory Powers Tribunal, Parliament’s “ouster” of High Court judicial review powers is not binding – Omar Qureshi, Dan Tench and Cathryn Hopkins

On 15 May 2019, the Supreme Court handed down its judgment in the case of R (on the application of Privacy International) v Investigatory Powers Tribunal ([2019] UKSC 22), deciding by a slim majority of 4:3 that an “ouster clause” in section 67(8) of the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000 (“RIPA”) that purports to exclude from challenge or appeal any decision of the Investigatory Powers Tribunal (“IPT”), does not prevent a judicial review challenge based on an error of law. Continue reading

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