Society’s dependence on the internet: 5 cyber issues the coronavirus lays bare – Laura DeNardis and Jennifer Daskal

29 03 2020

As more and more U.S. schools and businesses shutter their doors, the rapidly evolving coronavirus pandemic is helping to expose society’s dependence – good and bad – on the digital world. Read the rest of this entry »





Google wants to move UK users’ data to the US: what does that mean for your rights? – Henry Pearce

6 03 2020

It was recently reported that Google was planning to move the personal data of its UK users out of the EU and into the US. Several outlets reporting on this story have suggested that this would mean that, as Britain has left the EU, the data would no longer be covered by the EU’s world-leading data protection law, the GDPR. Read the rest of this entry »





Free speech in the UK: it’s the business of parliament, not Ofcom, to judge what is OK to publish – Jeffrey Howard

3 03 2020

The UK government recently announced a new plan to regulate social media companies such as YouTube, Facebook and Twitter. The proposals give the government’s media regulator, Ofcom, extensive powers to tell tech giants what speech they must suppress – and to punish them if they don’t. Read the rest of this entry »





Online harms: the good, the bad and the unclear – David Barker

22 02 2020
When the government published its online harms white paper (OHWP) last spring we explained our view that the ideas in the white paper should represent the start of a journey towards greater regulation, rather than the final destination of that journey.

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Online Harms Deconstructed: the Initial Consultation Response – Graham Smith

20 02 2020

The abiding impression left by the government’s Initial Response to the Online Harms White Paper Consultation is that it is half-finished. Non-conclusions and conclusions sit side by side. Read the rest of this entry »





The European Data Protection Board’s Draft Guidelines for Search Engines and the Future of the ‘Right to be Forgotten’ Online, Part 2 – David Erdos

13 02 2020

This is the second part of a post dealing with the European Data Protection Board (EDPB)’s draft guidelines on the right to be forgotten.  Part (1) dealt with the scope of the guidance and of ex post rights vis-à-vis search engines.  This post will deal with (2) the substantive grounds for exercising these ex post rights, and (3) the substantive exemptions from these ex post rights. Read the rest of this entry »





The European Data Protection Board’s Draft Guidelines for Search Engines and the Future of the ‘Right to be Forgotten’ Online, Part 1 – David Erdos

12 02 2020

Securing workable, balanced and effective individual rights regarding personal data disseminated online is vital to the future of data protection and should be a significant focus of attention for the European Data Protection Board going forward. Read the rest of this entry »





Northern Ireland: Overview of internet intermediary and media law cases in 2019, Part 1 – Ciaran O’Shiel and Charlotte Turk

5 02 2020

It was a relatively quiet year, with only three published judgments from the Northern Ireland courts (the same as in 2018). There was one Court of Appeal case, involving reporting restriction orders, with the Crown Court and High Court delivering judgments dealing with a source disclosure order and ‘revenge porn’ images. Read the rest of this entry »





New year, new internet? Why it’s time to rethink anonymity on social media – David Babbs

31 01 2020

January 2020 sees two significant steps towards the UK improving regulation of social media companies. The government confirmed in the December Queen’s Speech that it would legislate to tackle “online harms”, and is now expected to provide some more details of how it will take this forward. Meanwhile, in the House of Lords, an Online Harm Reduction Bill was tabled on 14 January. Read the rest of this entry »





The Irish Government’s proposed Online Safety and Media Regulation Bill has a surprising omission – Eoin O’Dell

15 01 2020

Last October and November, I sketched the evolution of the government’s proposals for a digital safety commissioner. Following a consultation process last Spring, and missing the deadline of the end of the year by a few weeks, they have published their proposals for the general scheme of the Online Safety and Media Regulation Bill. Read the rest of this entry »