The Irish Government’s proposed Online Safety and Media Regulation Bill has a surprising omission – Eoin O’Dell

15 01 2020

Last October and November, I sketched the evolution of the government’s proposals for a digital safety commissioner. Following a consultation process last Spring, and missing the deadline of the end of the year by a few weeks, they have published their proposals for the general scheme of the Online Safety and Media Regulation Bill. Read the rest of this entry »





Internet legal developments to look out for in 2020 – Graham Smith

2 01 2020

Never mind Brexit, what is coming up on the UK internet legal scene in the coming year? The highlight of 2020 is of course the January publication of the 5th Edition of Internet Law and Regulation :-). That apart, here are some cases and legislation to look out for. (In accordance with long tradition this feature does not cover data protection). Read the rest of this entry »





We need a full public service internet: state-owned infrastructure is just the start – Christian Fuchs

10 12 2019

The UK Labour Party’s 2019 election manifesto contains plans to bring BT’s internet infrastructure business into public ownership by creating British Broadband and to roll out and provide superfast broadband free to all households and businesses. This would be funded via a digital tax on the profits of internet giants such as Amazon, Google and Facebook. Read the rest of this entry »





What you need to know about privacy policies – Suneet Sharma

8 12 2019

Sites you visit, applications you use and services you take all have privacy policies – but what are they and why are they important, despite many people just check boxing them? Read the rest of this entry »





Case Law: ABC v Google, Claimant who refused to tell the court or his opponent who he was runs out of track – Elisabeth Mason

5 12 2019

In ABC v Google LLC [2019] EWHC 3020 (QB) the High Court dismissed the latest attempt by an anonymous litigant-in-person (‘ABC’) to continue his ‘right to be forgotten’ claim against Google.  The claim concerned Google’s failure to block access to historic news reports concerning ABC (whomever he may be).  Extraordinarily, ABC pursued his claim for nearly two years without ever identifying himself either to his opponent or to the court. Read the rest of this entry »





The internet’s founder now wants to ‘fix the web’, but his proposal misses the mark – Terry Flew

28 11 2019

On March 12, the 30th anniversary of the World Wide Web, the internet’s founder Tim Berners-Lee said we needed to “fix the web”. The statement attracted considerable interest. Read the rest of this entry »





Australia: A push to make social media companies liable in defamation is great for newspapers and lawyers, but not you – Michael Douglas

28 11 2019

At his Wednesday 20 November 2019 address to the National Press Club, Attorney-General Christian Porter said the federal government is pursuing “immediate” defamation law reform. The announcement seemed a bit odd, as defamation is a subject for state and territory governments to legislate on. A NSW-led law reform process has been ongoing for years. Read the rest of this entry »





Ireland: The Government’s plans for a digital safety commissioner proceed apace – Eoin O’Dell

23 11 2019

In my earlier post on the demise of the UK’s current age-verification plans for online porn – and what that might mean for Ireland’s proposed Digital Safety Commissioner, I noted that long-standing Irish Government policy is to establish such a Commissioner, and that the current timetable is that it is intended to bring forward the necessary legislation before the end of the year. Read the rest of this entry »





Free broadband: internet access is now a human right, no matter who pays the bills – Merten Reglitz

19 11 2019

The UK Labour Party is promising to provide free broadband internet to every British household by 2030 if it wins the 2019 election. To do this, the party would nationalise the broadband infrastructure business of BT and tax internet giants like Google and Facebook. Read the rest of this entry »





Daily Mail publication of intimate images of Congresswoman Katie Hill’s sparks a conversation about ISP liability in revenge pornography cases – Colette Allen

14 11 2019

Katie Hill, the former Representative for Los Angeles, quit Congress last Thursday after intimate photos were leaked by her ex-husband and an investigation was launched into whether she had a relationship with her subordinate. In a tearful resignation video, Hill vowed to dedicate the rest of her career to fighting revenge pornography and getting justice for victims. In the UK, the Daily Mail stuck its nose in by displaying the images on their website last week. This incident seemed as good a time as any to look into what avenues survivor-victims of revenge pornography can take under current English and Welsh law. Read the rest of this entry »