Monthly International Round Up – Suneet Sharma

24 06 2020

This is the sixth instalment in a regular new series from Inforrm highlighting press and case reports of new media and information cases from around the world.  It is intended to complement our United States: Monthly Round Up posts.  Please let us know if there are other cases and jurisdictions which we should be covering. Read the rest of this entry »





South Africa: Fake news about Covid-19 now a criminal offence – Dario Milo and Johan Thiel

22 03 2020

As Covid-19 infections spread rapidly around the globe and governments everywhere scramble to limit infections, fake news about the disease on social networks has become a major problem. There have even been some arrests – in India, Hungary and Kenya – of people who have spread fake news about Covid-19, using existing local laws. Read the rest of this entry »





Case Law, South Africa: amaBhungane Centre v Minister of Justice, Landmark ruling impresses even ultimate whistle-blower Edward Snowden – Dario Milo

21 09 2019

The South African High Court judgment in the case of amaBhungane Centre for Investigative Journalism  v Minister of Justice and Correctional Services [2019] ZAGPPHC 384 is a victory for privacy rights. Read the rest of this entry »





South Africa: Why waving the apartheid flag amounts to hate speech – Dario Milo and Lavanya Pilla

9 09 2019

On 21 August 2019, Phineas Mojapelo, the Deputy Judge President of the South Gauteng Division of the High Court in the case of, Nelson Mandela Foundation Trusts v Afriforum NPC ([2019] ZAEQC 2) ruled that the display of the pre-1994 South African flag – the apartheid flag – constitutes hate speech. Read the rest of this entry »





Critics of South Africa’s judges are raising the temperature: legitimate, or dangerous? – Hugh Corder

31 08 2019

The South African judiciary is once more centre stage in the political drama unfolding around the battle for supremacy within the governing African National Congress (“ANC”). Read the rest of this entry »





Here’s how tech giants profit from invading our privacy, and how we can start taking it back – Katharine Kemp

13 08 2019

Australia’s consumer watchdog has recommended major changes to consumer protection and privacy laws. If these reforms are adopted, consumers will have much more say about how we deal with Google, Facebook, and other businesses. Read the rest of this entry »





Case Law, South Africa: Manuel v Economic Freedom Fighters, The legal consequences of fake news – Dario Milo

6 06 2019

“Fake news” – a term ironically made popular by Donald Trump – is a real problem for our democracy.  This is not news which the publisher reasonably believes to be true because, for example, steps have been taken to verify the information. Read the rest of this entry »





South African journalism’s problems are bigger than ethics: they’re about ethos – Anthea Garman

21 10 2018

File 20181019 105751 apog7i.jpg?ixlib=rb 1.1When the editor of the Sunday Times in South Africa, Bongani Siqoko, published an apology in the newspaper earlier this month he surely set a new precedent in the country’s journalism. Read the rest of this entry »





The paradox of tolerance is put to the test in South Africa – Elmien du Plessis

1 03 2018

File 20180223 108150 w7zsni.jpg?ixlib=rb 1.1Three days after Jacob Zuma resigned as South African president, the Afrikaans Sunday paper Rapport published two opinion pieces on opposing pages. The two writers, singer Steve Hofmeyr and poet Antjie Krog, dealt with Zuma’s contested legacy under the combined headline “The fall of a mistake”). Read the rest of this entry »





South African business must own up to its part in the corruption scandals – Mills Soko

6 08 2017

South Africa is reeling from a string of scandals involving state owned enterprises and the Guptas, a family with close ties to President Jacob Zuma. A trove of recently leaked Gupta emails exposed the involvement of prominent businesses in the extensive corruption networks. Sibonelo Radebe asked Mills Soko to explain the implications of the scandals. Read the rest of this entry »