Law and Media Round Up – 24 June 2019 [Updated]

24 06 2019

The private life of prospective Prime Minister Boris Johnson dominated the press over the past few days after Guardian reported that the police had been called to the London flat he shares with his partner after neighbours heard (and recorded) a “loud altercation”. Read the rest of this entry »





Putting children at the centre: is re-designing the digital environment possible? – Mariya Stoilova and Sonia Livingstone

23 06 2019

Children (and adults alike) seem to be ‘playing tag’ with a sophisticated and fast-changing digital environment whose privacy parameters are hard to define and consequences even harder to predict. Read the rest of this entry »





Data Protection: ICO reports on Adtech and Real Time Bidding, finds that data protection laws are being ignored

22 06 2019

On 20 June 2019 the Information Commissioner’s Office published its Update Report into Adtech and Real Time Bidding [pdf] dealing with the use of personal data the real time bidding (“RTB”) process in online advertising. Read the rest of this entry »





Australia: Four laws that need urgent reform to protect both national security and press freedom – Denis Muller

21 06 2019

In a perfect world, Australia would introduce constitutional protections for freedom of the press. But since the chances of that are next to zero, it might be more productive to look instead at what might be done to make the existing web of secrecy laws less repressive. Read the rest of this entry »





News: Council of Europe publishes “Guidelines on Safeguarding Privacy in the Media” as a tool for journalists

20 06 2019

The Council of Europe has published “Guidelines on Safeguarding Privacy in the Media” [pdf]. These are a collection of standards of the Council of Europe and the European Court of Human Rights concerning the protection of privacy of public figures and private individuals in the media. They also include data protection principles based on various regulatory instruments and best practices. Read the rest of this entry »





Surveillance cameras will soon be unrecognisable: time for an urgent public conversation – William Webster

19 06 2019

It is often argued that the UK is the most surveilled country on the planet. This may or may not have been the case in the past but there are certainly now millions of surveillance cameras in public spaces – not to mention private buildings and homes. Read the rest of this entry »





Case Law: Kennedy v National Trust for Scotland: No pictures, please, Scotland versus England as a forum for defamation cases – Dan Tench, Emma Boffey, Graeme MacLeod and Jo Clark

18 06 2019

The Court of Appeal in England & Wales has handed down its judgment in the matter of Howard Kennedy v The National Trust for Scotland [2019] EWCA Civ 648, on appeal from the decision of Sir David Eady, sitting as a judge of the High Court on the Queen’s Bench Division Media and Communications List. Read the rest of this entry »





Law and Media Round Up – 17 June 2019

17 06 2019

The most  important media law event of the week was the judgment of the Supreme Court in Lachaux v Independent Print ([2019] UKSC 27).  We had a news piece about the judgment and a case comment from Mathilde Groppo. Read the rest of this entry »





New regulations aim to end gender stereotypes in adverts: but I suggest they could go further – Magdalena Zawisza

16 06 2019

Remember the infamous “beach body ready” campaign from 2015 for the supplement brand Protein World? It’s the one that challenged passersby with a steel-gazed, bikini clad, perfectly toned model and the slogan: “Are you beach body ready?”. And what about the ad by fashion retailer Zara in 2017, where skinny teenage girls encouraged women to “love” their curves? Read the rest of this entry »





Case Law: Spicer v Commissioner of Police for the Metropolis, Headlines must be read in context – Oscar Davies

15 06 2019

In the case of Spicer v Commissioner of Police of the Metropolis [2019] EWHC 1439 (QB) Warby J held that an article’s headline, however defamatory, must be read in context, with the text of the article, in order to arrive at the natural and ordinary meaning. The judgment provides a useful exposition of the ‘bane and antidote’ principle. Read the rest of this entry »