Critics of South Africa’s judges are raising the temperature: legitimate, or dangerous? – Hugh Corder

31 08 2019

The South African judiciary is once more centre stage in the political drama unfolding around the battle for supremacy within the governing African National Congress (“ANC”). Read the rest of this entry »





Learning from the British Airways and Marriott International fines: What does the GDPR standard of “Appropriate Technical and Organisational Measures” actually mean? Part 2 – Ashley Hurst and Nina Lazic

30 08 2019

The first part of this article detailed the baseline technical measures that companies should be taking in order to remain GDPR compliant. Alongside these technical measures, it is equally important to ensure that robust organisational measures are in place. Read the rest of this entry »





Learning from the British Airways and Marriott International fines: What does the GDPR standard of “Appropriate Technical and Organisational Measures” actually mean? Part 1 – Ashley Hurst and Nina Lazic

29 08 2019

In July 2019, the sea-change in data protection enforcement became abundantly clear when, in the space of two days, the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) announced its intention to fine British Airways £183.39 million and Marriott International £99.3 million in relation to their high profile data breaches. Read the rest of this entry »





Case Law: R (Ngole) v The University of Sheffield, Blanket Ban on “Homophobic” religious expression disproportionate – Samuel Rowe

28 08 2019

On 3 July 2019, the Court of Appeal handed down its decision in R (Ngole) v University of Sheffield ([2019] EWCA Civ 1127).  The case concerned an appeal against a dismissed judicial review of the decision to remove Felix Ngole, a social work student, from his course. Read the rest of this entry »





Facial recognition: ten reasons you should be worried about the technology – Birgit Schippers

27 08 2019

Facial recognition technology is spreading fast. Already widespread in China, software that identifies people by comparing images of their faces against a database of records is now being adopted across much of the rest of the world. It’s common among police forces but has also been used at airports, railway stations and shopping centres. Read the rest of this entry »





Tackling hate speech: Intersecting approaches and the Raheem Stirling case – Suneet Sharma

24 08 2019

The case of footballer Raheem Stirling provides an avenue into the oft-overlooked issue of hate speech prevention and deterrence. The Stirling case provides an opportunity to consider the adequacy of English law in tackling hate speech, a nuanced and increasingly difficult to isolate issue. Read the rest of this entry »





Silicon Valley wants to read your mind: here’s why you should be worried – Garfield Benjamin

23 08 2019

Not content with monitoring almost everything you do online, Facebook now wants to read your mind as well. The social media giant recently announced a breakthrough in its plan to create a device that reads people’s brainwaves to allow them to type just by thinking. Read the rest of this entry »





New rules for media and communications claims – Iain Wilson and Elisabeth Mason

22 08 2019

From 1 October 2019 new rules – in the form of a revised Part 53, Media and Communication Claims, revised/new practice directions (PD 7A, 53A and 53B) and an all encompassing Pre-action Protocol – will apply to claims in England and Wales arising from media and communications disputes. Read the rest of this entry »





The privacy implications of using facial recognition software – Suneet Sharma

21 08 2019

The use of facial recognition software (“FRS”) in security and monitoring was thrust into the spotlight by the London Mayor Sadiq Khan, taking issue with a London developer over its installation in a King’s Cross site. Read the rest of this entry »





Reporting Family Courts: An example of why headlines matter – Lucy Reed

20 08 2019

We have seen a number of reports dealing with the sad story of a young father called Christopher Brown who took his own life by hanging. The reports follow a Coroner’s Inquest into the death and most have similar copy which suggest they are based upon a single syndicated news report. Read the rest of this entry »