Amazon, Facebook and Google don’t need to spy on your conversations to know what you’re talking about – Jason Nurse

27 01 2019

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If you’ve ever wondered if your phone is spying on you, you’re not alone. One of the most hotly debated topics in technology today is the amount of data that firms surreptitiously gather about us online. You may well have shared the increasingly common experience of feeling creeped out by ads for something you recently discussed in a real life conversation or an online interaction. Read the rest of this entry »





How governments use Big Data to violate human rights – Andrew Thompson

20 01 2019

The right to privacy has become a pressing human rights issue. And rightly so. Big data — combined with artificial intelligence and facial recognition software — has the capacity to intrude on people’s lives in unprecedented ways, in some cases on a massive scale. Read the rest of this entry »





The legal implications of digital privacy – Florencio Travieso

16 01 2019

file-20190114-43541-16aeec8A June 2018 decision rendered by the Supreme Court of the United States established an interesting principle on digital privacy in a case related to a criminal proceeding. Read the rest of this entry »





Hacked Off: Gatwick Drones and Cliff’s Law: privacy invasion without public interest justification

15 01 2019

The debate on whether a new law should be introduced, dubbed ‘Cliff’s Law’, has recently resurfaced.  This is in part due to the ‘Gatwick Drones’coverage over the Christmas period, when a couple was, in effect, wrongly accused on the front page of two national newspapers of being involved in criminal activity after they were arrested on suspicion of being responsible for the Gatwick airport drone disruption. Read the rest of this entry »





Article 8 and the “outside world”: privacy, reputation and employment – Hugh Tomlinson QC

10 01 2019

The Article 8 right to respect for private life has many facets and has often seemed in danger of uncontrolled expansion.  The Court of Human Rights has often noted that private life is “not susceptible to exhaustive definition”, embracing “multiple aspects of the person’s physical and social identity”.  Read the rest of this entry »





Book Review: “Remedies for Breach of Privacy” edited by Jason N E Varuhas and N A Moreham – Emma Foubister

8 01 2019

This book is a collection of essays from leading academics, practitioners and judges on questions raised by the emergent law of remedies for breach of privacy. It arose out of the International Workshop on Remedies for Breach of Privacy, held at Melbourne Law School in December 2016, which encouraged new thinking about the common law approach to this topic. Read the rest of this entry »





A brief introduction to the concept of privacy under English law, Part III – Suneet Sharma

28 12 2018

From the landmark case of Campbell and the development of breach of privacy as an action, it is clear that the integration of privacy as a concept in English law is still in its formative years. In Part III we consider some of the significant cases post-Campbell to date, bringing into relief key issues and developments in privacy law, many of which are ongoing or merit further consideration by the courts. Read the rest of this entry »