Forcing online platforms to remove footage of violent attacks: could privacy help? – Jelena Gligorijevic

21 03 2019

The attack on two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand, last week saw the perpetrator publish footage of his violent attack, as it was happening, online. That footage was republished on various platforms as well as by some news media outlets. Read the rest of this entry »





Privacy pivot: Facebook wants to be more like WhatsApp. But details are scarce – Sacha Molitorisz

14 03 2019

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Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg delivered a 3,000+ word post last week, spelling out a new vision for the social network. It prompts just one small question: Facebook, who are you? Read the rest of this entry »





University of Amsterdam: 2019 IViR Summer Course on Privacy Law and Policy

1 03 2019

Online activities quite often involve transfers of personal data between the European Union (EU) and the United States (US), for example when using online search, social networks and many mobile apps. Both regions are governed by different rules on the protection of informational privacy and personal data. Read the rest of this entry »





Case Law: Fearn and the Board of Trustees of the Tate Gallery, Emanations of the Tate, a “self induced incentive to gaze” is not nuisance – Athalie Matthews

28 02 2019

In the recent case of Fearn v  The Board of Trustees of the Tate Gallery ([2019] EWHC 246 (Ch)) the High Court analysed privacy rights from a novel perspective in both literal and legal terms. Read the rest of this entry »





Brexit whispers: when eavesdropping on private conversations by a journalist is ethically justified – Dave Porter

17 02 2019

File 20190214 1721 194fe1x.jpg?ixlib=rb 1.1When you are in a restaurant or a hotel bar the last thing you expect is for the private conversation you are having to be reported all over the media the next day. But that may well depend upon who you are and what you say. Read the rest of this entry »





Case Law: R (P, G and W) and Anor v Secretary of State for the Home Department, A criminal record or a clean slate? – Matthew Flinn

8 02 2019

In the case of R (P, G and W) and Anor v Secretary of State for the Home Department and Anor [2019] UKSC 3 the Supreme Court upheld challenges to the legal regimes for disclosing criminal records in England and Wales, and Northern Ireland, finding them to be incompatible with Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights (“ECHR”). Read the rest of this entry »





Top 10 Privacy and Data Protection Cases of 2018: a selection

29 01 2019

Inforrm reported on a large number of privacy and data protection cases in 2018.  In January 2017 we published a widely read post on “Data Protection: Overview of the Case Law in 2017”. In this post we round up some of the most legally and factually interesting privacy and data protection cases from England and Europe from the past year. Read the rest of this entry »





Amazon, Facebook and Google don’t need to spy on your conversations to know what you’re talking about – Jason Nurse

27 01 2019

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If you’ve ever wondered if your phone is spying on you, you’re not alone. One of the most hotly debated topics in technology today is the amount of data that firms surreptitiously gather about us online. You may well have shared the increasingly common experience of feeling creeped out by ads for something you recently discussed in a real life conversation or an online interaction. Read the rest of this entry »





How governments use Big Data to violate human rights – Andrew Thompson

20 01 2019

The right to privacy has become a pressing human rights issue. And rightly so. Big data — combined with artificial intelligence and facial recognition software — has the capacity to intrude on people’s lives in unprecedented ways, in some cases on a massive scale. Read the rest of this entry »





The legal implications of digital privacy – Florencio Travieso

16 01 2019

file-20190114-43541-16aeec8A June 2018 decision rendered by the Supreme Court of the United States established an interesting principle on digital privacy in a case related to a criminal proceeding. Read the rest of this entry »