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Tag: LSE Media Policy Project Blog (Page 3 of 4)

Holding the “sovereigns of cyberspace” accountable – Rebecca MacKinnon

DigitalIn 2014, more than 213 million people around the world went online for the first time. According to Freedom House, which tracks trends in Internet freedom and openness around the world, these new users have less freedom to speak their minds, freely access information, and organise around civil, political, and religious interests than those who first logged on five years ago. Continue reading

An Internet Bill of Rights? Pros and cons of the Italian way – Oreste Pollicino and Marco Bassini

pollicino-bassiniLast week, an Italian committee of politicians and experts announced its Declaration of Internet Rights, making Italy the first country to introduce an internet bill of rights. Oreste Pollicino, Professor of Comparative Public Law and Media Law at Bocconi University and Counsel of Portolano Cavallo Studio Legale, and Marco Bassini, PhD Researcher in Constitutional Law at the University of Verona and Fellow at Bocconi University, look at what the Declaration means in practice. Continue reading

Ending 2014 in Media Policy: out of one election into another – Sally Broughton Micova

LSE Media Policy ProjectThe big European event of the year was, of course, the election of the new European Parliament and Commission. The interruption of the elections left us waiting for the outcome of the Commission’s consultation on copyright, which received a record number of responses and should lead to a proposal for changes to EU rules. The proposed changes to EU data protection legislation were also on hold. Continue reading

The IMPRESS Project: a viable, independent model of press regulation? – Jonathan Heawood

jonathan-heawood-150x150IPSO has now officially launched, but it did so under a cloud, and with the support of only part of the industry. The Independent, the Guardian and the Financial Times no longer belong to the self-regulatory body for press journalism. This was not the outcome intended by Leveson, Parliament, nor the public, and this is why the IMPRESS Project is in the process of designing an alternative. Continue reading

Social Media Offences: About the Crime, Not the Medium – Jessica Mason

gpp-headshot-1-1-150x150The House of Lords Communications Committee has been hearing oral evidence in its inquiry into social media offences. The inquiry, while not exclusively focused on “revenge porn,” takes place amidst a surge in media coverage on revenge porn in the UK, spurred by MP Maria Miller’s statements in the House of Commons and Justice Secretary Chris Grayling’s promise that the government is looking into the issue. Continue reading

A “Super-right” to Data Protection? The Irish Facebook Case and the Future of EU Data Transfer Regulation – Christopher Kuner

Christopher KunerThe Court of Justice of the European Union has yet another data protection case on its docket, this time involving the transfer of data by Facebook from the EU to the US. Christopher Kuner Brussels-based Associate Professor at the University of Copenhagen and Visiting Fellow in LSE’s Department of Law, explains what is at stake. He argues that, since invalidating the EU’s Data Retention Directive earlier this year, the Court seems increasingly to consider data protection a “super-right” and should not forget the need to balance with freedom of expression. Continue reading

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