The International Forum for Responsible Media Blog

Tag: LSE Media Policy Project Blog (Page 2 of 4)

Press regulation: three reasons why a 30 year old campaign must continue – Steven Barnett

National NewspapersWith the government’s consultation on whether to proceed with the section 40 cost-shifting incentives of the Leveson framework now closed, there will be a brief political pause. Neither that consultation nor the intense political manoeuvring that is likely to follow should distract us from the long-standing and urgent need to tackle reform of press regulation in order to protect both the public and public interest journalism. Continue reading

How Brexit might affect EU audiovisual media services policy making – Alison Harcourt

AVMSD 1160 x 650In light of the replies to the public consultation on Directive 2010/13/EU on Audio-Visual Media Services (AVMSD), the Commission’s Regulatory Fitness (REFIT) exercise, the public consultation on the EU Satellite and Cable Directive, national consultations and a possible exit of the UK from the EU, it is time to consider the current issues affecting UK stakeholders in the cross-border audio-visual services sector. Continue reading

Data protection through the lens of competition law: will Germany lead the way? – Inge Graef and Brendan Van Alsenoy

germany-1177268_1920_fullOn 2 March 2016, the Bundeskartellamt, the German competition authority announced its decision to initiate proceedings against Facebook on suspicion that the social network provider had abused its dominant position by infringing data protection rules.  This case represents the first attempt by a European competition authority to integrate data protection interests into competition analysis, and raises interesting questions about the interface between these two areas of law. Continue reading

A very brief history of interception in Britain – Bernard Keenan

gchq1Britain is in the process of legislating a new system of control over the interception of communication. The Investigatory Powers Bill, currently being debated in draft form, aims to give an unprecedented level of transparency and accountability to the use of government surveillance powers. In this ‘long read’ piece Bernard Keenan provides some historical context on the issue of interception, arguing that the more the law oversees secret activities, the more secretive the law becomes. Continue reading

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