United States: Monthly Round Up – 6 October 2019

6 12 2019

Welcome to INFORRM’s US Monthly Round Up which we have decided to revive for the benefit of our readers. Posts will consider monthly developments in media law across the United States. We hope readers find this useful. Read the rest of this entry »





Case Law: ABC v Google, Claimant who refused to tell the court or his opponent who he was runs out of track – Elisabeth Mason

5 12 2019

In ABC v Google LLC [2019] EWHC 3020 (QB) the High Court dismissed the latest attempt by an anonymous litigant-in-person (‘ABC’) to continue his ‘right to be forgotten’ claim against Google.  The claim concerned Google’s failure to block access to historic news reports concerning ABC (whomever he may be).  Extraordinarily, ABC pursued his claim for nearly two years without ever identifying himself either to his opponent or to the court. Read the rest of this entry »





Defamation Update: Serious Harm, Lachaux and Beyond – Emma Linch

4 12 2019

Section 1(1) of the Defamation Act 2013 provides that “A statement is not defamatory unless its publication has caused or is likely to cause serious harm to the reputation of the claimant.” As Warby J said in Doyle v Smith [2018] EWHC 2935 (QB)“This is a beguilingly simple sentence. Inevitably, though, there was debate as to its meaning and effect before and after the Act came into force on 1 January 2014.”  Read the rest of this entry »





Case Law: Orphans from Syria, Reporting Restriction Orders and Children – FC ReportingWatch

3 12 2019

Mr Justice Keehan last week published an extraordinary judgment of a mere 17 staccato paragraphs. It is called Re Orphans From Syria [2019] EWHC 3202 (Fam). It begins : Read the rest of this entry »





Law and Media Round Up – 2 December 2019 [Updated2]

2 12 2019

A permanent injunction has been granted to regulate protests against the teaching of “LGBT issues” at Anderton Park School in Birmingham.  After a 5 day trial in October, Warby J handed down a reserved judgment on Tuesday 26 November 2019 ([2019] EWHC 3217 (QB)). Read the rest of this entry »





Global Freedom of Expression, Columbia University: Newsletter

1 12 2019

Columbia Global Freedom of Expression seeks to contribute to the development of an integrated and progressive jurisprudence and understanding on freedom of expression and information around the world.  It maintains an extensive database of international case law. This is its newsletter dealing with recent developments  in the field. Read the rest of this entry »





Australia: The ugly truth: tech companies are tracking and misusing our data, and there’s little we can do – Suranga Seneviratne

30 11 2019

As survey results pile, it’s becoming clear Australians are sceptical about how their online data is tracked and used. But one question worth asking is: are our fears founded? The short answer is: yes. Read the rest of this entry »





Case Law, Strasbourg: Pryanishnikov v. Russia: Refusal to grant a licence for the reproduction of erotic material violated Article 10 – Argyro Chatzinikolaou

29 11 2019

In Pryanishnikov v Russia ([2019] ECHR 614), a case concerning the authorities’ refusal to grant the applicant a film reproduction license, the European Court of Human Rights found a violation of the right to freedom of expression, as the only reason advanced by the domestic courts for the refusal of the relevant license had been based on mere suspicions rather than findings of fact. Read the rest of this entry »





The internet’s founder now wants to ‘fix the web’, but his proposal misses the mark – Terry Flew

28 11 2019

On March 12, the 30th anniversary of the World Wide Web, the internet’s founder Tim Berners-Lee said we needed to “fix the web”. The statement attracted considerable interest. Read the rest of this entry »





Australia: A push to make social media companies liable in defamation is great for newspapers and lawyers, but not you – Michael Douglas

28 11 2019

At his Wednesday 20 November 2019 address to the National Press Club, Attorney-General Christian Porter said the federal government is pursuing “immediate” defamation law reform. The announcement seemed a bit odd, as defamation is a subject for state and territory governments to legislate on. A NSW-led law reform process has been ongoing for years. Read the rest of this entry »