Law and Media Round Up – 11 June 2018

11 06 2018

The most widely covered media news of the week was the announcement that the Editor of the Daily Mail, Paul Dacre, was stepping down after 26 years and was being appointed Chairman and Editor in Chief of Associated Newspapers Limited. Read the rest of this entry »





Daily Mail editor Paul Dacre to step down (but don’t expect much to change) – Ivor Gaber

10 06 2018

File 20180607 137306 1lh2nat.jpg?ixlib=rb 1.1Among the glowing tributes to Daily Mail editor Paul Dacre – who has announced he will step down in November after 26 years at the helm – I have yet to spot one that mentions this description of his methods from a recent unauthorised history of the newspaper: Read the rest of this entry »





Case Law, Strasbourg: Benedik v Slovenia: Police need court order to access subscriber information associated with a dynamic IP address – Argyro Chatzinikolaou

9 06 2018

In its judgement in the case of Benedik v Slovenia the Fourth Section of the Court held i that there had been a violation of Article 8 (right to respect for private and family life) with regard to the failure of the Slovenian police to obtain a court order before accessing subscriber information associated with a dynamic IP address[1]. Read the rest of this entry »





“Persons Unknown Cases”: some recent issues – Adam Speker

8 06 2018

In media and communications litigation, one party name has become increasingly common. Not News Group or Associated or even Google. It is the party known as Person or Persons Unknown. Read the rest of this entry »





Media and Law Cases: Trinity Legal Term Preview

7 06 2018

The Trinity Legal Term began on Tuesday, 5 June and ends on Monday, 31 July 2018.  This post deals with media law cases listed for this term and cases in which decisions are awaited. Please let us know if there are any other media law cases which should be added to this post. Read the rest of this entry »





Google “Thumbs its Nose” at New Zealand’s Courts: Kiwis Should Look to Canada for a Precedent – Hugh Stephens

6 06 2018

Google is at it again. According to press reports in the New Zealand Herald, Google refused to comply with a New Zealand court order to suppress details and remove content related to a local murder trial because, according to a representative of Google NZ, “Google LLC, was a separate legal entity incorporated in the US, meaning New Zealand’s courts and laws held no power over it.” Tell that to the Supreme Court of Canada. Read the rest of this entry »





GDPR and journalism: the new regime – Greg Callus

5 06 2018

David Cameron was often derided as an “essay crisis” Prime Minister – the Oxford PPE undergraduate model of relying on good general knowledge and trusting your ability to pick up the details only as peril looms large. Read the rest of this entry »