BBC Panorama on anti-semitism: a catalogue of reporting failures – Media Reform Coalition

12 08 2019

The BBC transmitted an edition of Panorama on 10 July called ‘Is Labour Anti-Semitic?’, presented by John Ware. It contained allegations that senior Labour figures close to Jeremy Corbyn had interfered with the internal investigations process and that the Party was insufficiently committed to tackling anti-semitism within its own ranks. Read the rest of this entry »





Australia: Will the High Court ruling on public servant’s tweets have a ‘powerful chill’ on free speech? – Anthony Forsyth

10 08 2019

The Israel Folau termination case has dominated headlines for months now. Many Australians have been intrigued by the extent to which employers like Rugby Australia are able to control the social media activity of their employees – in Folau’s case, a high-profile player who tweeted his condemnation of homosexuals and others. Read the rest of this entry »





Practice Note: Media and Communications List becomes a Specialist List, new CPR 53, Practice Directions and Pre-Action Protocol

9 08 2019

In a major change to the media litigation landscape, wholly new version of CPR 53 and its Practice Directions have been published along with a new Pre-Action Protocol for all media and communication claims. Read the rest of this entry »





Case Law, Scotland: B C and Ors v Chief Constable of Police Service of Scotland, Police WhatsApp Group chats not private – Darryl Hutcheon

8 08 2019

A police force is conducting a criminal investigation into a sexual offence alleged to have been committed, as it happens, by one of its own officers. The force seizes his phone and comes across WhatsApp group chats in which several other officers in its service have posted offensive messages. Read the rest of this entry »





IPSO and Andrew Norfolk: They just won’t face the facts – Brian Cathcart

7 08 2019
What does a sham press regulator do when presented with detailed evidence of serious standards failures at the Times newspaper? Nothing.

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Case Comment: Cape Intermediate Holdings v Dring, “A victory for open justice” – Devina Shah

6 08 2019

In a decision described as a “victory for open justice”, the Supreme Court has held that non-parties to litigation are entitled to access certain documents from a trial to which it was not a party. Read the rest of this entry »





Lifelong anonymity orders: do they still work in the social media age? – Faith Gordon and Julie Doughty

5 08 2019

Lifelong anonymity orders for adults who were convicted of crimes as children are rarely granted. In theory, these orders legally prevent a person ever being identified. But given that information is now shared at lightning speed across different platforms, can these orders still work in practice? Read the rest of this entry »





Pseudoscience is taking over social media: and putting us all at risk – Santosh Vijaykumar

4 08 2019

Search for “climate change” on YouTube and before long you’ll likely find a video that denies it exists. In fact, when it comes to shaping the online conversation around climate change, a new study suggests that deniers and conspiracy theorists might hold an edge over those believing in science. Read the rest of this entry »





IPSO gets a new chair, a former Tory Minister – Brian Cathcart

3 08 2019
The corporate papers demonstrate yet again that they are happy for politicians to have a role in press regulation – so long as they’re from the right party.

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Inforrm is taking a summer break

2 08 2019

The 2018-2019 legal year in England and Wales ended on Wednesday 31 July 2019.  The civil courts in England and Wales are now on “Summer Vacation” for 2 months until the Michaelmas term begins on 1 October 2019. Read the rest of this entry »