Time to rethink truth and trust – Sonia Livingstone

16 10 2018

The LSE Truth, Trust and Technology Commission (T3) deals with the crisis in public information – aka “fake news”, Cambridge Analytica, election hacking, the crisis in journalism, filter bubbles, biased algorithms, ill-informed citizens and more. Read the rest of this entry »





Law and Media Round Up – 15 October 2018

15 10 2018

On 8 October 2018 Warby J handed down judgment in the data protection representation action of Lloyd v Google ([2018] EWHC 2599 (QB)). He refused the representative claimant permission to serve the claim on Google in California. There was an Inforrm case comment and a post on the Panopticon blog. Read the rest of this entry »





Spent Convictions: The Foibles of the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act within the Context of Internet Permanence – Samuel McCann

14 10 2018

The shockwaves of a criminal conviction can be felt far beyond the conclusion of any sentence; the stigma of criminality often frustrates social interaction and employment long into the future. The prospect of being labelled a ‘criminal’ by the State can frequently be as great a source of consternation as the punishment itself. Read the rest of this entry »





Case Law: Lloyd v Google, No compensation for Google data breaches – Rosalind English

13 10 2018

Most of us resignedly consent to the use of cookies in order to use internet sites, vaguely aware that these collect information about our browsing habits in order to target us with advertisements. It’s annoying, but does it do us any harm? That is the question that came up before Warby J in a preliminary application for a representative claim in the case of Lloyd v Google LLC [2018] EWHC 2599 (QB). Read the rest of this entry »





Anticipatory regulation: a way forward for platform governance? – Jelena Dzakula

12 10 2018

A wide consensus has emerged that regulatory framework for platforms like Google and Facebook needs to change. Calls for action are coming from a range of different stakeholders in the UK, with proposed solutions varying in terms of models of regulation, and who should implement them. Read the rest of this entry »





Case Law, Strasbourg: Savva Terentyev v Russia, Conviction for inciting hatred against the police violated blogger’s freedom of expression – Dirk Voorhoof

11 10 2018

In Savva Terentyev v. Russia the ECtHR has applied a very high level of free speech-protection for aggressively insulting and hostile comments about police officers, published on a weblog. The ECtHR observes that some of the wording in the blog post was offensive, insulting and virulent, but it found that the (emotional and sarcastic) comments as a whole could not be seen as inciting to hatred or violence. Read the rest of this entry »





A Lord Chamberlain for the internet? Thanks, but no thanks – Graham Smith

10 10 2018

This summer marked the fiftieth anniversary of the Theatres Act 1968, the legislation that freed the theatres from the censorious hand of the Lord Chamberlain of Her Majesty’s Household. Thereafter theatres needed to concern themselves only with the general laws governing speech. In addition they were granted a public good defence to obscenity and immunity from common law offences against public morality. Read the rest of this entry »