Vacation Round Up – 27 May 2019

27 05 2019

The Easter legal term ended on Friday 24 May 2019.  The Trinity Legal Term begins on Tuesday 4 June 2019.  Inforrm is, therefore, taking a “mini-break” but this round up will cover some of the news of the past week. Read the rest of this entry »





The Jeremy Kyle affair: Four things you need to know – Trevor Barnes and Meriem Anou

26 05 2019

ITV‘s decision to permanently suspend the production of The Jeremy Kyle Show is making headlines. However, this should not come as a surprise given recent controversies surrounding duty of care issues in reality television programmes. Ofcom and MPs must tread very carefully in proposing new duty of care obligations on broadcasters to look after adult contributors. Read the rest of this entry »





Facebook doesn’t fool me: but I worry about how it affects you – Joseph B. Walther

25 05 2019

File 20190520 69204 1q7cp6p.jpg?ixlib=rb 1.1A number of prominent figures have called for some sort of regulation of Facebook – including one of the company’s co-founders and a venture capitalist who was one of Facebook’s early backers. Read the rest of this entry »





GDPR: The digital age of consent, one year on – Alex Cooney

24 05 2019

This Saturday, 25 May, will be the one year anniversary of Europe’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) coming into force. Alex Cooney, CEO of CyberSafeIreland, a non-profit working to empower children, parents and teachers to navigate the online world in a safe and responsible manner, discusses the impact of the regulation on children, particularly the GDPR’s requirement for a digital age of consent. Read the rest of this entry »





Case Law: R (Privacy International) v Investigatory Powers Tribunal, Parliament’s “ouster” of High Court judicial review powers is not binding – Omar Qureshi, Dan Tench and Cathryn Hopkins

23 05 2019

On 15 May 2019, the Supreme Court handed down its judgment in the case of R (on the application of Privacy International) v Investigatory Powers Tribunal ([2019] UKSC 22), deciding by a slim majority of 4:3 that an “ouster clause” in section 67(8) of the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000 (“RIPA”) that purports to exclude from challenge or appeal any decision of the Investigatory Powers Tribunal (“IPT”), does not prevent a judicial review challenge based on an error of law. Read the rest of this entry »





The Impact of Grief Journalism on its Subjects – Nicole Moreham and Yvette Tinsley

22 05 2019

The depiction of grief and intense anxiety is commonplace in modern journalism. Little work has been done though to examine the impact of the collection and publication of grief-focused coverage on those who appear in it. Read the rest of this entry »





Reporting the Court of Protection: NB on Re NB – Barbara Rich

21 05 2019

At the beginning of April 2019, a Press Association report of an interim hearing at the Court of Protection provoked a number of newspaper headlines and outraged reactions, because it quoted a High Court judge, Mr Justice Hayden, as having spoken of a “fundamental human right” of a man to have sex with his wife.  Read the rest of this entry »





Law and Media Round Up – 20 May 2019

20 05 2019

On Friday 17 May 2019, the Court of Appeal (Lewison, McCombe and Haddon-Cave LJJ) handed down a judgment ([2019] EWCA Civ 852) which comprehensively reversed the decision of the first instance judge, Mr Justice Jay, given after a 7 day libel trial. Read the rest of this entry »





News: Statement in Open Court: Damages against four newspapers awarded to “Police Notice” biker over false impersonation claims

19 05 2019

In a Statement in Open Court [pdf] read before Warby J on 16 May 2019 it was recorded that a motorcycle enthusiast had won libel claims against four national newspapers that had falsely claimed he attempted to deceive the public into believing he was a police officer. Read the rest of this entry »





Case Law, Strasbourg: Prior restraint of campaigning for a peaceful but unauthorised demonstration violated Article 10 – Ronan Ó Fathaigh and Dirk Voorhoof

18 05 2019

On 30 April 2019, in Kablis v. Russia, the Third Section of the European Court of Human Rights (“ECtHR”) unanimously found that the blocking by Russian authorities of an activist’s social networking account and entries on his blog had breached his right to freedom of expression under Article 10 of the European Convention on Human Rights. Read the rest of this entry »