Law and Media Round Up – 21 October 2019

21 10 2019

In a news week dominated, as usual, by Brexit the newspapers continued with their predictable and entrenched editorial positions.  The vote in Parliament on Saturday was, on the front page of the Mail on Sunday “House of Fools”, in contrast, the Sunday Mirror had the Prime Minister “Humiliated”.  The Guardian had a piece with the front pages and headlines from the various Sunday newspapers. ITV news also had coverage. Read the rest of this entry »





How freedom of expression in academia is under threat from academics themselves – Steven Greer

20 10 2019

Freedom of expression has long been extolled by those who love freedom generally. As George Orwell once said: “If liberty means anything at all, it means the right to tell people what they do not want to hear.” And, according to the European Court of Human Rights, this includes offending, shocking and disturbing. Read the rest of this entry »





The demise of the UK’s current age-verification plans for online porn and what that might mean for Ireland – Eoin O’Dell

19 10 2019

Earlier this week, in a written statement to the House of Commons, the UK’s Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, the Rt Hon Nicky Morgan MP, announced the end of the UK’s controversial age-verification plans for online porn Read the rest of this entry »





The real news on ‘fake news’: politicians use it to discredit media, and journalists need to fight back – Andrea Carson and Kate Farhall

18 10 2019

During the 2019 Australian general election, a news story about the Labor Party supporting a “death tax” – which turned out to be fake – gained traction on social media.  Now, Labor is urging a post-election committee to rule on whether digital platforms like Facebook are harming Australian democracy by allowing the spread of fake news. Read the rest of this entry »





Case Law, Strasbourg: Gürbüz and Bayar v. Turkey, Dangerous “triple pirouette” to find criminal prosecution for media coverage of PKK statements did not violate Article 10 – Ronan Ó Fathaigh and Dirk Voorhoof

17 10 2019

The European Court’s Second Section recently found that criminal proceedings against the owner and the editor of a newspaper for having published statements by the leader of a terrorist organisation were justified and did not violate the right to freedom of expression. Read the rest of this entry »





New Report: IPSO five years on: “fails to satisfy 25 out of 38 Leveson recommendations”

16 10 2019

A new report from the Media Standards Trust [pdf] has found that the press complaints handling body, IPSO, fails 25 out of 38 of Leveson’s recommendations for an effective and independent press regulator. Read the rest of this entry »





Transparency Project: Off to IPSO we go … (hey ho)

15 10 2019

On 27 August the Express published an article under their ‘crusade’ to ‘End this injustice’ (in family courts). We were concerned that it contained serious inaccuracies and was misleading. We wrote about that in a post on 30 August : The Danger of Crusades. On 1 September we also lodged a complaint with The Express about those inaccuracies, referencing Clause 1 IPSO Editors’ Code. Read the rest of this entry »





Law and Media Round Up – 14 October 2019

14 10 2019

On 8 October 2019, Ben Stokes was once again the subject of widespread press coverage when pictures which were said to show the England player acting aggressively towards his wife face after the Professional Cricketers’ Association Awards. Ben Stokes’ wife Clare has denied as “nonsense” allegations the couple had a physical altercation. There was a piece on the BBC website. Read the rest of this entry »





What ‘Coleen Rooney vs Rebekah Vardy’ tells us about contemporary gender politics – Jilly Boyce Kay and Melanie Kennedy

13 10 2019

The furore over the apparent betrayal of Coleen Rooney by her friend Rebekah Vardy – who is accused of leaking private information about the Rooney family to The Sun newspaper – has generated reams of British media coverage, conversation and commentary in just a few days. Read the rest of this entry »





Why we need a national commitment to open justice data – Judith Townend

13 10 2019

Justice ‘data’ – that is the information that arises from the process and administration of justice – is perhaps one of the most fundamentally important administrative data categories in public life. Read the rest of this entry »