Law and Media Round Up – 16 July 2018

16 07 2018

On Wednesday 18 July 2018, Mr Justice Mann will hand down his eagerly awaited reserved judgment the case of Sir Cliff Richard v BBC.  This was heard on in April and May 2018 over a period of thirteen days. Read the rest of this entry »





House of Lords Communications Committee Inquiry “The Internet: to regulate or not to regulate?”, An overview of the evidence, Part 1 – Oscar Davies

15 07 2018

The House of Lords Communications Committee has launched an inquiry into how the regulation of the internet should be improved.  Oral and Written evidence has been provided to the Committee by a very wide range of companies, NGOs and individuals from a variety of perspectives.   Read the rest of this entry »





Theresa May did the bidding of the press, now they call her a traitor – Brian Cathcart

14 07 2018
She used up capital cancelling Leveson 2 for them, but it did not buy her favourable coverage. She is the corporate papers’ ever-willing victim: the more she appeases them, the harder they kick her.

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Beyond publication offences: informal censorship and the chain of communication – Jacob Rowbottom

13 07 2018

Various legal controls that are imposed on publishers provide a central focus in the study of media law. When teaching the subject, the core topics on the syllabus look at the liability of publishers in criminal law and tort law. These controls remain significant, but there appears to be a declining use of this method of control in some areas of law. Last year, when writing an article about the law of obscenity, Read the rest of this entry »





How to cure media amnesia – Laura Basu

12 07 2018

I’ve written previously about the role played by media amnesia in the decade of austerity and general doom we’ve found ourselves in since the 2008 financial crisis. Briefly, after the banking collapse, private debt became public debt as governments saved their banking sectors and the credit crunch led to a deep recession. Read the rest of this entry »





Case Law, Luxembourg, Facebook “Fan Page” case, administrator held to be data controller and jurisdictional issues clarified – Sara Mansoori

11 07 2018

In an important decision the CJEU has found that the administrator of a Facebook ‘fan page’ was a joint data controller with Facebook Ireland and Facebook Inc, and that a German data protection supervisory authority is competent to assess the lawfulness of data processing carried out by Facebook Germany, applying German data protection law. Read the rest of this entry »





Case Law, Canada: Haaretz.com v Goldhar: Supreme Court rules on jurisdiction and forum in multi-jurisdictional Internet defamation claims – Natasha Holcroft-Emmess

10 07 2018

In Haaretz.com v Goldhar 2018 SCC 28, the Canadian Supreme Court considered jurisdiction and forum conveniens in a multi-jurisdictional Internet libel claim. The Court was divided – allowing the news organisation’s appeal 6:3. All of the Justices concluded that Canada had jurisdiction to hear the claim, but a majority found that Israel was a clearly more appropriate forum. Read the rest of this entry »