Inforrm: Poll Results and the Top Ten Posts of All Time

29 10 2011

Last week we had two “polls” of our readers – on frequency and subject matter of posting.  On the first, the results were perhaps not surprising.  A clear majority – 60% of the voters – favoured one post a day.   Nobody wanted less than one a day. 

A number of readers gave obvious and proper answers along the lines of – “quality rather than quantity“, “longer and more researched posts“.  Well, we do try and mix up news and case comments.  Overall, on the basis of the poll we seem to be getting things more or less right.

On the second “What areas would you like to see covered on Inforrm?” poll the clear individual winner was “the law of privacy” – with more than 30% of the votes – but “all of the above” came a close second.    No one suggested that we were failing to cover important topics.

When we posted our polls we also set out the top ten posts of the last quarter.  Today we provide our list of the “top ten posts of all time”.  They are as follows:

Harassment and injunctions: Cheryl Cole – Natalie Peck

Case Law: ETK v News Group Newspapers “Privacy Injunctions and Children” – Edward Craven

The MP and the “Super-Injunction” – rumour, myth and distortion (again)

“The cases of Vanessa Perroncel and John Terry – a curious legal affair” – Dominic Crossley

News: Hemming MP’s “super injunction victim” named as sex abuse fabricator

Wayne Rooney’s Private Life and the Public Interest [Updated]

 Anonymity, “Take That” and Reporting Privacy Injunctions

 Opinion: “Supreme Court of Canada Recognizes Limited Right to Access Government Documents” Paul Schabas and Ryder Gilliland

Privacy law: the super-injunction is dead

Responsible journalism and William Hague


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31 10 2011
Law and Media Round Up – 31 October 2011 « Inforrm's Blog

[…] Last week’s Inforrm poll indicated that readers want at least a post a day and more content related to privacy law. All but two of the ‘Top Ten Posts of All Time’ were about privacy injunctions. […]

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