News: UK Supreme Court grants permission to appeal in part in Vidal-Hall v Google, misuse of private information is definitively a tort

28 07 2015

google-headquarters-signThe UK Supreme Court has today granted Google partial permission to appeal in the Vidal-Hall case.  The permission covers the data protection issues but not the issue as to whether misuse of private information is a tort.  On this last issue the decision of the Court of Appeal ([2015] EWCA Civ 311) stands.   Misuse of private information is now clearly established as a tort and the claims can proceed against Google regardless of the result of the data protection appeal.   Read the rest of this entry »





Ireland: Full Breach Damages in data protection cases, the impact of Vidal-Hall on Collins v FBD – Eoin O’Dell

11 07 2015

FBDDataSubjectThe Court of Appeal decision in Google Inc v Vidal-Hall [2015] EWCA Civ 311(27 March 2015) (Dyson MR and Sharp LJ in a joint judgment; McFarlane LJ concurring), affirming the judgment of Tugendhat J (at[2014] EWHC 13 (QB) (16 January 2014)), is a very important decision on damages for invasion of privacy, and it raises significant questions about the correctness of Feeney J’s reasoning in the earlier Irish case of Collins v FBD Insurance plc [2013] IEHC 137 (14 March 2013). Read the rest of this entry »





Court of Appeal upholds landmark judgement against Google arising from its exploitation of Apple’s Safari web-browser privacy settings – Alison Knight

10 04 2015

screen-310714__1803In March 2015, the English Court of Appeal ruled that three individuals may bring claims against Google for misuse of their private information and breach of the UK’s Data Protection Act 1998 (DPA). Although this decision only arose because of the need to serve a claim form in the US outside English jurisdiction, it addresses a considerable number of contentious questions surrounding online behavioural advertising and the scope of UK data protection rules and other areas of English law related to the protection of online users’ privacy interests. Read the rest of this entry »