Press Reporting: Did a council ‘act perversely’ to offer a jailed rapist a chance to see his victim’s child? – FC ReportingWatch

29 11 2018

This week has seen another Andrew Norfolk front page article in The Times about the wrongs committed in the Family Court and by social services. Sadly, just like last time, this is a sensationalised headline and article which ignores some important facts and legal context. Read the rest of this entry »





Bob the Builder: can IPSO fix it? – Paul Magrath

8 11 2018

The Transparency Project referred a complaint to the Independent Press Standards Organisation after the Daily Mail refused to correct substantive inaccuracies in a headline and article about a family court judgment. Read the rest of this entry »





Guidance issued to court staff on supporting media access – Paul Magrath

1 11 2018

Last week the Ministry of Justice issued Guidance to staff on supporting media access to courts and tribunals as “part of a wider effort to build stronger working relationships between courts and the press and maintain the principle of open justice as we increasingly digitise court services.” Read the rest of this entry »





Is high quality journalism sustainable? Transparency Project evidence to the Cairncross Review

26 09 2018

The Cairncross review was set up by the government in March 2018 to investigate “how to sustain the production and distribution of high-quality journalism in a changing market”. Read the rest of this entry »





The Muslim Foster Carer Case: the final chapter – Transparency Project Reporting Watch

19 09 2018

Last autumn we covered the so-called ‘muslim foster carer’ case, over a number of blog posts (you can find those posts here). Last week, just as we’d given up hope of ever finding out what happened to the little girl at the heart of the case, the judgment is out. Or, to be precise – Tower Hamlets have provided selected journalists with a copy of an authorised summary of the judgment. (We know at least one journalist who has been hammering on the door of every judge he can think of to try and get this flipping summary. Our own email to the judicial press office went unanswered). Read the rest of this entry »





Case Law: Burki v. Seventy Thirty Ltd, Plenty of fish, too little caviar – Barbara Rich

1 09 2018

The case of Burki v. Seventy Thirty Ltd, Seventy Thirty Ltd [2018] EWHC 2151 (QB) offers a vivid glimpse into the real-life world of “Wry Society”, a regular feature in the Financial Times How to Spend Itmagazine, which holds a mirror up to its readership by satirising the tastes and foibles of High Net Worth Individuals in pursuit of expensively “curated” lifestyles. Read the rest of this entry »





Press regulation: the end of the road for Leveson reforms – Paul Magrath

5 03 2018

On 1 March 2018 the government announced that it would not be proceeding with the second stage of the Leveson Inquiry, and would seek to repeal section 40 of the Crime and Courts Act 2013. This post explains the background to that decision and assesses where that leaves us with press regulation. Read the rest of this entry »