Case Law: MN v OP, Money, money, money, must be funny, in an [anonymised beneficiary’s] world, protecting child beneficiaries in variation of trust cases – Paul Magrath

8 06 2019

A typical plot development in old novels is the sudden discovery of unexpected wealth, usually in the form of an inheritance, or the discovery of a long lost will or hidden relationship to a wealthy benefactor.  Read the rest of this entry »





Reporting the Court of Protection: NB on Re NB – Barbara Rich

21 05 2019

At the beginning of April 2019, a Press Association report of an interim hearing at the Court of Protection provoked a number of newspaper headlines and outraged reactions, because it quoted a High Court judge, Mr Justice Hayden, as having spoken of a “fundamental human right” of a man to have sex with his wife.  Read the rest of this entry »





Byline Times: a new approach to journalism? – Paul Magrath

17 04 2019

Having been developed as an online journal, Byline Times has now launched itself into the physical newspaper world with a special Brexit Edition. They say: Read the rest of this entry »





Discover Leveson: new online resource offers researchers convenient access to historic inquiry evidence – Paul Magrath

12 04 2019

A comprehensive and interactive online research resource, containing all the evidence and publications of the Leveson Inquiry into press misconduct (2011-12) has been developed and hosted by Kingston University under the leadership of its Professor of Journalism, Brian Cathcart. Read the rest of this entry »





Family Courts: The President’s guidance on anonymisation in published judgments – Annie Bertram

17 03 2019

On 7 December 2018, Sir Andrew McFarlane, the President of the Family Division [pic], issued some practice guidance to judges entitled Practice Guidance: anonymisation and avoidance of the identification of children and the treatment of explicit descriptions of the sexual abuse of children in judgments intended for the public arena (see January [2019] Fam Law 68). Read the rest of this entry »





Could Cairncross help public interest law reporting? – Judith Townend

24 02 2019

On the surface, the Government’s launch of a review into the sustainability of journalism was commendable but cynical onlookers were dubious from the outset. Given the fraught history of media policy-making and the large commercial media groups’ impressive lobbying clout, would smaller players be heard and would the review make recommendations that served a genuine public interest in the free flow of ideas and information? Read the rest of this entry »





Family Courts Anonymisation Guidance: a curtain of secrecy? – FCReportingWatch

20 12 2018

The President of the Family Division, Sir Andrew MacFarlane recently issued some guidance on the anonymisation of published judgments in family court cases. You can read that guidance here. Read the rest of this entry »





Press Reporting: Did a council ‘act perversely’ to offer a jailed rapist a chance to see his victim’s child? – FC ReportingWatch

29 11 2018

This week has seen another Andrew Norfolk front page article in The Times about the wrongs committed in the Family Court and by social services. Sadly, just like last time, this is a sensationalised headline and article which ignores some important facts and legal context. Read the rest of this entry »





Bob the Builder: can IPSO fix it? – Paul Magrath

8 11 2018

The Transparency Project referred a complaint to the Independent Press Standards Organisation after the Daily Mail refused to correct substantive inaccuracies in a headline and article about a family court judgment. Read the rest of this entry »





Guidance issued to court staff on supporting media access – Paul Magrath

1 11 2018

Last week the Ministry of Justice issued Guidance to staff on supporting media access to courts and tribunals as “part of a wider effort to build stronger working relationships between courts and the press and maintain the principle of open justice as we increasingly digitise court services.” Read the rest of this entry »