The International Forum for Responsible Media Blog

Tag: The Conversation (Page 1 of 41)

Clickbait extremism, mass shootings, and the assault on democracy: time for a rethink of social media? – Shirley Leitch

Social media companies have done well out of the United States congressional hearings on the January 6 insurrection. They profited from livestreamed video as rioters stormed the Capitol Building. They profited from the incendiary brew of misinformation that incited thousands to travel to Washington D.C. for the “Save America” rally. They continue to profit from its aftermath. Clickbait extremism has been good for business. Continue reading

It’s hard to imagine better social media alternatives, but Scuttlebutt shows change is possible – Kate Mannell and Eden T Smith

Last week, the US government released six principles for reforming Big Tech. It’s the latest example of growing efforts to regulate the handful of companies with enormous influence over the internet. But while there’s a growing appetite for a new, better kind of internet, it’s hard to imagine what that might look like. Continue reading

Australia: Farm Transparency and New South Wales, What this High Court decision on filming animals in farms and abattoirs really means – Danielle Ireland-Piper

What do farm animals have to do with the Australian Constitution? Should the public know what happens in abattoirs and farms? Do we have the right to publish footage of what happens to animals in slaughterhouses? Should governments be able to make laws criminalising it? How do we best protect the privacy of farmers and prevent trespass? Continue reading

Impending demise of Roe v. Wade puts a spotlight on a major privacy risk: Your phone reveals more about you than you think – Susan Landau

When Politico published Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito’s draft opinion that would undo Roe v. Wade, a number of commentators observed how hard it would be for women in states that had made abortion illegal to safely travel to abortion clinics elsewhere. Their phones’ location histories would give them away, or maybe their search histories would. Even their texts might do so. Continue reading

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