Brexit whispers: when eavesdropping on private conversations by a journalist is ethically justified – Dave Porter

17 02 2019

File 20190214 1721 194fe1x.jpg?ixlib=rb 1.1When you are in a restaurant or a hotel bar the last thing you expect is for the private conversation you are having to be reported all over the media the next day. But that may well depend upon who you are and what you say. Read the rest of this entry »





Social media doesn’t need new regulations to make the internet safer: GDPR can do the job – Eerke Boiten

16 02 2019

From concerns about data sharing to the hosting of harmful content, every week seems to bring more clamour for new laws to regulate the technology giants and make the internet “safer”. But what if our existing data protection laws, at least in Europe, could achieve most of the job? Read the rest of this entry »





Cairncross review: two cheers and two fears for the future of UK journalism – Steven Barnett

15 02 2019

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When the then culture secretary, Matt Hancock, first announced a government review of the future of “high-quality” journalism, there was widespread scepticism about his motives. Having just surrendered to a powerful press lobby in abandoning the Leveson recommendations on self-regulation, was this government making an honest attempt to resolve the growing and serious problem of journalism’s broken business model? Read the rest of this entry »





Online trolling used to be funny, but now the term refers to something far more sinister – Evita March

6 02 2019

File 20190131 108351 w5ujdy.jpg?ixlib=rb 1.1 It seems like internet trolling happens everywhere online these days – and it’s showing no signs of slowing down. This week, the British press and Kensington Palace officials have called for an end to the merciless online trolling of Duchesses Kate Middleton and Meghan Markle, which reportedly includes racist and sexist content, and even threats. Read the rest of this entry »





Data privacy rules in the EU may leave the US behind – Thomas Holt

3 02 2019

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France made headlines on 21 January 2019 for fining Google US$57 million – the first large fine to be issued for violations of the European Union’s newly implemented General Data Protection Regulations. GDPR, as it’s called, is meant to ensure consumers’ personal information is appropriately used and protected by companies. It also creates procedures to sanction companies who misuse information. Read the rest of this entry »





The end of web neutrality, the end of the Internet? – Hervé Debar

1 02 2019

A December 2017 decision by the Federal Communication Commission (FCC), the American agency responsible for regulating the US telecom sector (equivalent of the French ARCEP and the European BEREC), has changed the status of its Internet-service providers. While Europe is protected because of the law on open Internet access, adopted in 2015, the change in the United States provides a good opportunity for reflecting on the neutrality of Internet services. Read the rest of this entry »





Amazon, Facebook and Google don’t need to spy on your conversations to know what you’re talking about – Jason Nurse

27 01 2019

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If you’ve ever wondered if your phone is spying on you, you’re not alone. One of the most hotly debated topics in technology today is the amount of data that firms surreptitiously gather about us online. You may well have shared the increasingly common experience of feeling creeped out by ads for something you recently discussed in a real life conversation or an online interaction. Read the rest of this entry »