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Tag: Sir Cliff Richard (Page 1 of 3)

Why Sir Cliff Richard’s case was rightly decided: Part 1: Reasonable expectation of privacy – Thomas Bennett

In a recent post on Inforrm, my good friend Dr Paul Wragg sets out a detailed argument critiquing the High Court’s recent decision in Cliff Richard’s successful privacy claim against the BBC (Richard v BBC). Wragg takes the view that the reasoning of Mann J in the case is deficient in a number of respects, and that his disposal of the case is unsatisfactory. Continue reading

Upholding celebrities’ privacy and problematising news media claims to freedom of expression: Sir Cliff Richard v BBC – Jelena Gligorijević

Amidst considerable media attention, and the continuing attention of legal commentators, Sir Cliff Richard won his privacy case against the BBC for its coverage of a raid on his home during a police investigation of historic sex offence allegations against him, and its naming of him as the suspect. Mann J confirmed Sir Cliff’s strong privacy right in the circumstances, and criticised the national broadcaster’s over-zealous journalistic practices in running that story. Continue reading

Why Sir Cliff Richard’s case was wrongly decided – Paul Wragg

There are three reasons why I think the case of Sir Cliff Richard v BBC is wrongly decided.  Firstly, it seems to me that whilst a wrong has been done to Sir Cliff, this was committed by the police when it, or someone within it, disclosed information to the BBC that Sir Cliff was being investigated as part of Operation Yewtree (it must be stressed that the CPS announced on 16 June 2016 that no charges would be made against Sir Cliff and that, as was said in court, ‘he is an innocent man in the eyes of the law’). Continue reading

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