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Tag: Section 40 (Page 1 of 2)

The Press is obliged to make good, not do good: why the crime-busting myth harms the SLAPPs debate, or why we need section 40, Crime and Courts Act – Paul Wragg

We need to do away with these libel laws, says Meirion Jones in The Guardian, because they only protect evildoers and they stop us, the press, from bringing them to justice. I can reveal, he continued, that The Sun could have brought Jimmy Savile to justice in 2008 but the threat of libel action meant that all the testimony they collected was wasted and so, since the chance of a scoop was gone, they did nothing with it… Continue reading

Leveson: Section 40 of the Crime and Courts Act: should it have been brought into force rather than being treated as a question of government policy? – Christopher Whitmey

The Crime and Courts Act 2013 (‘CCA’) sections 34-42 inclusive are headed “Publishers of news-related material: damages and costs” and form a complete and closely integrated scheme enacted for the public benefit, and the protection of the press from spurious complaints, for implementation as a whole. How can bringing section 40 into force logically be a question of government policy? Continue reading

Press Regulation: We are only one signature away from a revolution in access to justice – Brian Cathcart

It is a longstanding national scandal that, although in principle the law protects us against libel and breach of privacy by news publishers, with rare exceptions those laws work only for the rich. The vast majority of people in Britain simply can’t afford to go to court to uphold their right not to be lied about and and their right to have a private life. Continue reading

With ‘no-win-no-fee’ deals harder to get in libel cases, government must choose whether to back the corporate press or the ordinary citizen – Brian Cathcart

The Supreme Court has dismissed appeals brought by the Murdoch, Mail and Mirror newspaper companies in relation to costs they must pay in libel and privacy cases they have lost – but at the same time the judges have thrown the future of access to justice in such cases into the lap of the government. Continue reading

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