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Tag: Paul Wragg (Page 1 of 3)

The Press is obliged to make good, not do good: why the crime-busting myth harms the SLAPPs debate, or why we need section 40, Crime and Courts Act – Paul Wragg

We need to do away with these libel laws, says Meirion Jones in The Guardian, because they only protect evildoers and they stop us, the press, from bringing them to justice. I can reveal, he continued, that The Sun could have brought Jimmy Savile to justice in 2008 but the threat of libel action meant that all the testimony they collected was wasted and so, since the chance of a scoop was gone, they did nothing with it… Continue reading

The Unbearable Loudness of Cancellation: How the Court of Appeal failed free speech in Miller v College of Policing – Paul Wragg

Freedom of speech is quite the enigma. Just ask Laura Murray. When Rachel Riley retweeted, with embellishments, Owen Jones’s comment that if you don’t want to be pelted with eggs, you shouldn’t be a Nazi, moments after Corbyn had himself been pelted, his stakeholder manager lambasted Riley. Not unreasonably, Murray took Riley to be both condoning violence toward politicians and to be labelling Corbyn a Nazi. Continue reading

The Times, IPSO and the Mystery of the Systematic Breaches Sanction – Paul Wragg

In June 2019, Brian Cathcart and Paddy French published a report which accused Andrew Norfolk and The Times of an anti-Muslim bias in its reporting.  They mention three articles specifically.  Of these, two resulted in complaints to IPSO, both of which were upheld.  In the first, Tower Hamlets v The Times, the newspaper was ‘ordered’ to publish a summary of the adjudication. Continue reading

Lord Hain and Privilege: When power, wealth and abuse combine to subvert the rule of law – Paul Wragg

Judges have their role to play, and Parliamentarians theirs, and “it is for the public to judge whether what I have done is right or wrong”, says Lord Peter Hain.  Yet since Lord Hain chose to breach the court injunction issued by the Court of Appeal in ABC v Telegraph Group plc by hiding behind Parliamentary privilege, this is exactly what the public does not get to do.  Continue reading

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