Reporting Family Courts: An example of why headlines matter – Lucy Reed

20 08 2019

We have seen a number of reports dealing with the sad story of a young father called Christopher Brown who took his own life by hanging. The reports follow a Coroner’s Inquest into the death and most have similar copy which suggest they are based upon a single syndicated news report. Read the rest of this entry »





Legal bloggers reporting the family courts: a level playing field? – Lucy Reed

21 11 2017

In August THAT Muslim foster carer story hit the press (‘Christian child forced into foster care’, The Times, 28 August 2017). The Times journalist Andrew Norfolk, lauded for his expose of the Rotherham child sexual abuse scandal, was the subject of trenchant criticism for what was widely perceived as anti-Islamic coverage of a case involving a white Christian child placed with (it was said) Muslim foster carers who did not speak English and who withheld a crucifix and spaghetti carbonara from the child. Read the rest of this entry »





Daily Mail: “Child killer’s £2m legal aid” Two million things wrong with this headline – Lucy Reed

8 08 2016

Ben ButlerOn 5 August 2016, the The Daily Mail, ran an article about the Ellie Butler case based on Freedom of Information Act requests to the Ministry of Justice. Similar articles appeared elsewhere, for example Huffington Post and The Guardian, all in a similar vein, although perhaps slightly less colourfully expressed than the Mail’s version.  Read the rest of this entry »





When journalists ignore source material it is public debate which pays the price – Lucy Reed

25 06 2015

PAY-Rebecca-MinnockChristopher Booker wrote about the case of Ethan Williams in The Telegraph on 20 June 2105, in an article entitled: “When judges defy instinct, it is children who pay the price – We were presented with two flatly opposing views of the story of Rebecca Minnock, who went on the run with her son“.  Read the rest of this entry »