The International Forum for Responsible Media Blog

Tag: Hugh Stephens Blog (Page 1 of 2)

The “Declaration for the Future of the Internet”: What Does it Mean for Copyright Industries? – Hugh Stephens

On 28 April 2022, with little advance notice, an announcement was released by various governments informing the world that they had just signed a Declaration for the Future of the Internet”. In all, sixty-one countries signed this grandiose-sounding document, ranging from Albania to Uruguay. Signatories notably included the US, which was the sponsor of the Declaration, the 27 countries of the EU, the UK, Japan, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and four of the five Nordic countries. Continue reading

Grappling with Online Safety Legislation: How to Hold the Platforms Accountable – Hugh Stephens

When it comes to online safety—or its flip side, online harms—many countries are grappling with the problem. What is the role of government in establishing guidelines and regulations for the protection of citizens, particularly vulnerable segments of the population, from a range of harms perpetrated by anti-social and even criminal elements via the internet? What is the role of “internet intermediaries”, the internet distribution and social media platforms that the perpetrators use to attack their victims? Continue reading

Did Canada get “Section 230” Shoved Down its Throat in the US-Mexico-Canada Agreement? – Hugh Stephens

Last week in writing about the issue of SuperBowl ads, I referred to Annex 15-D of the new NAFTA, the US-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA, or CUSMA as it is referred to in Canada) that will restore (once the Agreement is in force) the practice of substituting Canadian ads into the Superbowl broadcast even if Canadians are watching the game on a US channel redistributed in Canada. Continue reading

Entering the Era of Internet Accountability: The Implications for Copyright – Hugh Stephens

I recently had the honour to be invited to give a guest lecture to the Copyright Society of Australia in Sydney. My talk focussed on how the Internet has evolved over the past twenty years, leading to a severe imbalance between Internet platforms and the creative community because of the abuse and misuse of safe harbours, and how recent events have put the big platforms in the spotlight—indeed in the crosshairs of the public and politicians. Continue reading

« Older posts

© 2022 Inforrm's Blog

Theme by Anders NorénUp ↑