Google wants to move UK users’ data to the US: what does that mean for your rights? – Henry Pearce

6 03 2020

It was recently reported that Google was planning to move the personal data of its UK users out of the EU and into the US. Several outlets reporting on this story have suggested that this would mean that, as Britain has left the EU, the data would no longer be covered by the EU’s world-leading data protection law, the GDPR. Read the rest of this entry »





The European Data Protection Board’s Draft Guidelines for Search Engines and the Future of the ‘Right to be Forgotten’ Online, Part 2 – David Erdos

13 02 2020

This is the second part of a post dealing with the European Data Protection Board (EDPB)’s draft guidelines on the right to be forgotten.  Part (1) dealt with the scope of the guidance and of ex post rights vis-à-vis search engines.  This post will deal with (2) the substantive grounds for exercising these ex post rights, and (3) the substantive exemptions from these ex post rights. Read the rest of this entry »





The European Data Protection Board’s Draft Guidelines for Search Engines and the Future of the ‘Right to be Forgotten’ Online, Part 1 – David Erdos

12 02 2020

Securing workable, balanced and effective individual rights regarding personal data disseminated online is vital to the future of data protection and should be a significant focus of attention for the European Data Protection Board going forward. Read the rest of this entry »





Case Law: ABC v Google, Claimant who refused to tell the court or his opponent who he was runs out of track – Elisabeth Mason

5 12 2019

In ABC v Google LLC [2019] EWHC 3020 (QB) the High Court dismissed the latest attempt by an anonymous litigant-in-person (‘ABC’) to continue his ‘right to be forgotten’ claim against Google.  The claim concerned Google’s failure to block access to historic news reports concerning ABC (whomever he may be).  Extraordinarily, ABC pursued his claim for nearly two years without ever identifying himself either to his opponent or to the court. Read the rest of this entry »





Territorial scope in recent CJEU cases: Google v CNIL / Glawischnig-Piesczek v Facebook – Cathryn Hopkins

9 11 2019

The Court of Justice of the European Union (the “CJEU”) has handed down a few intermediary-related judgments since September alone, and two are considered below. Although one relates to the E-Commerce Directive (the “ECD”) and the other to the Data Protection Direction (the “DPD”)/GDPR, a comparison of the judgments shows an apparently inconsistent approach of the CJEU to the territorial reach of injunctions against internet intermediaries. Read the rest of this entry »





ECJ confirms territorial limitations of ‘the right to be forgotten’ – Iain Wilson and Elisabeth Mason

3 10 2019

On 24 September 2019, whilst the country was focused on the United Kingdom Supreme Court as it ruled that the prorogation of the UK parliament was unlawful, the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU or ECJ), handed down judgment in Google LLC, successor in law to Google Inc. v Commission nationale de l’informatique et des libertés (CNIL), C‑507/17, effectively a sequel to the landmark data protection ‘Google Spain’ decision in May 2014. Read the rest of this entry »





The Right To Be Forgotten back in the CJEU: Court Judgments on the territorial scope of de-referencing; and sensitive personal data – Ian Helme

27 09 2019

Following on from the Advocate General Opinions published on 10 January (which I wrote about here), yesterday the Court of Justice released its decisions in two cases concerning internet search engines and the right to be forgotten. Read the rest of this entry »





Regulating Facebook, Google and Amazon is hard given their bewildering complexity – Zac Rogers

18 08 2019

Back in the 1990s – a lifetime ago in internet terms – the Spanish sociologist Manuel Castells published several books charting the rise of information networks. He predicted that in the networked age, more value would accrue in controlling flows of information than in controlling the content itself. Read the rest of this entry »





Google vs. Equustek: Unfortunate Precedent or Positive Development? – Hugh Stephens

19 04 2019

I have written about the case of Google Inc vs Equustek Solutions several times over the past couple of years (for example, herehere, and here). This series of blog posts tracked the evolution of the case. Read the rest of this entry »





Amazon, Facebook and Google don’t need to spy on your conversations to know what you’re talking about – Jason Nurse

27 01 2019

File 20190115 152983 1hite2f.jpg?ixlib=rb 1.1

If you’ve ever wondered if your phone is spying on you, you’re not alone. One of the most hotly debated topics in technology today is the amount of data that firms surreptitiously gather about us online. You may well have shared the increasingly common experience of feeling creeped out by ads for something you recently discussed in a real life conversation or an online interaction. Read the rest of this entry »