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Tag: Google Spain (Page 3 of 5)

News: Right to be forgotten claim against ICO rejected by the Administrative Court – Anya Proops

igooglemagesSo here’s the question: you’re an individual who wants to have certain links containing information about you deindexed by Google; Google has refused to accede to your request and, upon complaint to the ICO, the Commissioner has decided that your complaint is unfounded and so he refuses to take enforcement action against Google under s. 40 DPA 1998; can you nonetheless secure the result you seek in terms of getting your data forgotten by mounting a judicial review challenge to the ICO’s decision? Continue reading

News: ICO has dealt with only 120 Google Spain removal requests in the past year

ico_blue_flex_logoThe number of Google Spain “right to be forgotten” removal requests being challenged in England and Wales remains extremely small, less than 1% of the total number made to Google.

In his annual report dated 1 July 2015 [pdf] the Information Commissioner states that his office has “successfully dealt with over 120 complaints” received following the Google Spain judgment. Continue reading

Third Dutch Google Spain Ruling: convicted murderer does not have “right to be forgotten” – Emiel Jurjens

Screen-Shot-2015-06-01-at-19.41.50-150x150The ground-breaking Costeja González judgment of the ECJ was followed in the Netherlands by several proceedings about the ‘right to be forgotten’. This was also the objective of recent preliminary relief proceedings brought by a convicted killer. Having served his term, he has been trying to erase all online links between his name and the crime. In these attempts he met with resistance from an interest group and the father of his victim, who make online publications about the murder. Continue reading

Data Privacy and Intermediary Liability: Striking a balance between privacy, reputation, innovation and freedom of expression, Part 2 – Ashley Hurst

ashley profile picThis is the second part of a two part post.  The first part was published on 14 May 2015

Whilst the question of the liability of internet intermediaries for damages is very interesting, in the vast majority of cases, all claimants want is for the damaging material to be removed from the internet.  Continue reading

Court of Appeal upholds landmark judgement against Google arising from its exploitation of Apple’s Safari web-browser privacy settings – Alison Knight

screen-310714__1803In March 2015, the English Court of Appeal ruled that three individuals may bring claims against Google for misuse of their private information and breach of the UK’s Data Protection Act 1998 (DPA). Although this decision only arose because of the need to serve a claim form in the US outside English jurisdiction, it addresses a considerable number of contentious questions surrounding online behavioural advertising and the scope of UK data protection rules and other areas of English law related to the protection of online users’ privacy interests. Continue reading

Google: a data controller as well as an intermediary service provider? Does this make sense? Who cares? – Sophie Stalla-Bourdillon

GoogleSo everyone knows it, Google is polymorphous. It has experienced many different forms: mere facilitator, publisher, hosting provider, caching provider… The latest legal label stuck on its mutant forehead is that of “data controller” and this has been done quite “noisily” by the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) in its Google Spain “Costeja” judgment of 13 May 2014 (at least by listening to the numerous reactions that this judgement has triggered). Continue reading

Spain: The Right to Be Forgotten Does Not Apply to Google’s “Blogger” platform – Miguel Peguera

BloggerIn a recently reported ruling, the Spanish National High Court held that Google is not responsible for the processing of personal data on blog hosted on Google’s owned Blogger, and therefore, that the so called “right to be forgotten” established by the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) in the Google Spain case does not extend to a blogging platform. Continue reading

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