Privacy and public records: how to protect your personal information in an online age – Alicia Mendonca-Richards

4 10 2018

In this article we look at how to minimise the visibility of your personal information in online public records, without losing the benefits that online administration brings. Read the rest of this entry »





The French Tribunal of Nanterre’s Enforcement of the Royal Family’s Right to Privacy – Julie de Lassus Saint-Geniès

1 12 2017

On Tuesday 5 September 2017, the criminal Tribunal de Grande Instance in Nanterre, Paris, ruled that France’s Closer magazine, Laurence Pieau (its editorial director) and Ernesto Mauri (the chief executive of its publisher, the Mondadori group) had gravely infringed Prince William and Princess Catherine’s right to privacy and family life when they published topless photographs of the Duchess during their holiday in the South of France in 2012. Read the rest of this entry »





Prince Harry and David Beckham: a close look at IPSO’s approach to privacy – Oliver Lock

14 08 2017

IPSO recently published its decisions on two separate privacy complaints brought against the Mail Online: the first by Prince Harry (which was upheld) and the second by David and Victoria Beckham (which was not). Read the rest of this entry »





Sir Cliff Richard v the BBC: privacy rights and criminal investigations – Tom Rudkin

20 06 2017

The helicopter images broadcast as police raided Sir Cliff Richard’s home in Sunningdale were unquestionably one of the most controversial news segments of 2014.  The case highlights the issue of privacy rights in criminal investigations. Read the rest of this entry »





Twibel wars: Twitter is not “the wild west” in the eyes of the law – Oliver Lock

5 04 2017

Last month, Mr Justice Warby handed down judgment in Monroe v Hopkins [2017] EWHC 433 (QB), the first libel case to consider the “serious harm” test under section 1 of the Defamation Act 2013 within the context of a social media post.

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World-Check: what can you do if you find yourself on its database? – Michael Patrick

10 03 2017

Recent legal action taken by the Finsbury Park Mosque against Thomson Reuters has highlighted the reputational harm that can be caused if you are wrongly added to World-Check’s database. Read the rest of this entry »





Case Law: Economou v de Freitas, Is it interesting? New judgment considers the scope of the ‘public interest’ defence – Oliver Lock

28 09 2016

EconomouThe case of Economou v de Freitas ([2016] EWHC 1853 (QB)) was the first case to substantively consider in detail the new “public interest” defence since the Defamation Act 2013 came into force, clarifying that the Court will place a great deal of weight on whether the Defendant “reasonably believed” the publication was in the public interest and not just on whether it was a general matter of public interest. Read the rest of this entry »