Why people leave Facebook, and what it tells us about the future of social media – Mark Whitehead

17 01 2020

The number of active users of Facebook (those people who have logged onto the site in the previous month) has reached a historic high of 2.45 billion. To put this in some context, approximately 32% of the global population now use the social media platform, and the trend line of participation is still going up. Read the rest of this entry »





Facebook’s not a threat to the UK election – Anamaria Dutceac Segesten,

22 11 2019

The Cambridge Analytica scandal of March 2018 changed the status of Facebook forever. The revelation that a political consultancy had illicitly gained access to the data of millions of Facebook users forced the company to change its approach to privacy, including its rules and algorithms. Read the rest of this entry »





Territorial scope in recent CJEU cases: Google v CNIL / Glawischnig-Piesczek v Facebook – Cathryn Hopkins

9 11 2019

The Court of Justice of the European Union (the “CJEU”) has handed down a few intermediary-related judgments since September alone, and two are considered below. Although one relates to the E-Commerce Directive (the “ECD”) and the other to the Data Protection Direction (the “DPD”)/GDPR, a comparison of the judgments shows an apparently inconsistent approach of the CJEU to the territorial reach of injunctions against internet intermediaries. Read the rest of this entry »





The fightback against Facebook is getting stronger – Leighton Andrews

12 10 2019

Facebook leader Mark Zuckerberg recently took the unusual step of visiting lawmakers in Washington, including President Donald Trump in the White House. The reason? Congress’s anti-trust sub-committee has started demanding documents from Facebook and other big tech firms. It’s part of the committee’s investigation into whether dominant tech firms are acting anti-competitively. And Zuckerberg’s trip suggests the company is worried. Read the rest of this entry »





Regulating Facebook: a process, not an event – Leighton Andrews

28 09 2019

The Governor of the Bank of England, Mark Carney, recently flew half-way across the world to meet Mark Zuckerberg. While the Bank of England is being rather coy about what was discussed, a number of recent speeches by the Governor have raised questions about Facebook’s move into crypto-currency with its plans for its Libra system. Read the rest of this entry »





Filtering Facebook: Why Internet Users and EU Policymakers Should Worry about the Advocate General’s Opinion in Glawischnig-Piesczek – Daphne Keller

8 09 2019

Summer is winding down, and policymakers in Brussels are returning to an ambitious task: drafting new regulation for the Internet. Meanwhile, in Luxembourg, the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) is deciding cases that will affect both Internet platforms’ operations and lawmakers’ choices in devising new laws. Read the rest of this entry »





Facebook algorithm changes suppressed journalism and meddled with democracy – Jennifer Grygiel

3 09 2019

Facebook’s News Feed algorithm determines what users see on its platform – from funny memes to comments from friends. The company regularly updates this algorithm, which can dramatically change what information people consume. Read the rest of this entry »





Silicon Valley wants to read your mind: here’s why you should be worried – Garfield Benjamin

23 08 2019

Not content with monitoring almost everything you do online, Facebook now wants to read your mind as well. The social media giant recently announced a breakthrough in its plan to create a device that reads people’s brainwaves to allow them to type just by thinking. Read the rest of this entry »





Regulating Facebook, Google and Amazon is hard given their bewildering complexity – Zac Rogers

18 08 2019

Back in the 1990s – a lifetime ago in internet terms – the Spanish sociologist Manuel Castells published several books charting the rise of information networks. He predicted that in the networked age, more value would accrue in controlling flows of information than in controlling the content itself. Read the rest of this entry »





Why Facebook’s new ‘privacy cop’ is doomed to fail – Bhaskar Chakravorti

30 07 2019

The Federal Trade Commission issued its largest-ever fine, of US$5 billion, to Facebook for violating a 2011 privacy settlement in late July. But the amount is only about a month’s worth of the company’s revenue, suggesting that the fine, while seeming large, is, in fact, rather modest. Read the rest of this entry »