Twitter Cannot Keep Hiding Behind Blanket Anonymity – Stephen Kinsella

7 04 2020

The use of anonymous Twitter accounts was considered by a committee in the House of Lords last week, which examined how the social media giant’s “practices and policies affect UK democracy”. Read the rest of this entry »





New year, new internet? Why it’s time to rethink anonymity on social media – David Babbs

31 01 2020

January 2020 sees two significant steps towards the UK improving regulation of social media companies. The government confirmed in the December Queen’s Speech that it would legislate to tackle “online harms”, and is now expected to provide some more details of how it will take this forward. Meanwhile, in the House of Lords, an Online Harm Reduction Bill was tabled on 14 January. Read the rest of this entry »





Case Law: AAA v Rakoff, Lap dancers denied anonymity in privacy claim – Brett Wilson

6 10 2019

In AAA -v- Rakoff [2019] EWHC 2525 (QB) Mr Justice Nicklin set out the importance of claimants (and their lawyers) setting out a clear and consistent basis for seeking anonymity in civil proceedings. Read the rest of this entry »





Lifelong anonymity orders: do they still work in the social media age? – Faith Gordon and Julie Doughty

5 08 2019

Lifelong anonymity orders for adults who were convicted of crimes as children are rarely granted. In theory, these orders legally prevent a person ever being identified. But given that information is now shared at lightning speed across different platforms, can these orders still work in practice? Read the rest of this entry »





Straining the Alphabet Soup: Part 2, Drafting anonymity orders – Angus McCullough QC

8 05 2019

In Part 1 we looked at the circumstances in which a court may be prepared to grant anonymity in personal injury proceedings, and the applicable principles. In Part 2 I consider practical issues in the drafting of these orders, and problems encountered in this. Read the rest of this entry »





Practice Update: New rules on Hearings and the Publication of Orders for Anonymity and Private Hearings – Aidan Wills

29 04 2019

On 6 April 2019 an amended version of the rule governing hearings, CPR 39, came into force. The changes are intended to reinforce the principles of open justice.  The changes follow a consultation conducted by the Ministry of Justice in 2018. Read the rest of this entry »





Case Law: Ameyaw v PriceWaterhouseCoopers, Employment Tribunal judgment anonymity application fails – Media Lawyer

12 01 2019

In the case of Ameyaw v PriceWaterhouseCoopers ([2019] UKEAT 0244_18_0401) a former senior manager failed in a bid to win anonymity in a published judgment from an Employment Tribunal, and in an application for two decisions to be removed from public records available on the internet. Read the rest of this entry »





Transparency Project, Reporting Watch: Re X – a trade off between privacy and anonymity?

12 02 2017

masksbygetdownonflickr-1024x675Two judgments have recently been published by Mr Justice Bodey in a financial remedy case. The case is interesting in terms of the law around financial remedies, and from a transparency perspective. Read the rest of this entry »





Case Law: Armes v Nottinghamshire County Council, Naming your Abusers – Jonathan Metzer

25 11 2016

no_imageIn the case of Armes v Nottinghamshire County Council [2016] EWHC 2864 (QB) Males J held that the right of a claimant to name the people who abused her prevailed over the rights of the perpetrators and others to private and family life. Read the rest of this entry »





Does Elena Ferrante have the right to anonymity? – Nathan Capone

7 10 2016

elena-ferranteAn Italian investigative journalist has recently claimed to have ‘unmasked’ the pseudonymous Elena Ferrante, the bestselling Italian author of the ‘Neapolitan quartet’ of novels. Ferrante has consistently guarded her real identity and has been writing under the pseudonym since 1992. This raises interesting questions in connection with privacy rights and whether it could be considered a breach of Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights to reveal the name of an individual who otherwise wished to be anonymous. Read the rest of this entry »