The Sun still has the “Enemies of the People” in its sights – Julian Petley

1 10 2019

Glancing at the headlines of the Brexit press on 25 September 2019, one could have been forgiven for expecting a veritable flood of anti-juridicalism in their inside pages. Thus the Express demanded  ‘Unlawful? What’s lawful about denying 17.4m Brexit?’; the Mail focussed on Johnson’s reaction with ‘Boris blasts: Who runs Britain’? Read the rest of this entry »





Law and Media Round Up, End of Summer Break – 30 September 2019

30 09 2019

The Michaelmas Term legal term begins on Tuesday 1 October 2019 and the (intermittent) Inforrm summer break comes to an end today.  This post includes significant developments over the previous few weeks, since our Law and Media Summer Round Up. Read the rest of this entry »





Ben Stokes, The Sun and the notion of responsible journalism – Peter Coe

26 09 2019

On 17 September 2019, The Sun published a story about the England cricketer Ben Stokes and his family. This featured on the front page of its print edition and is available online under the headline ‘STOKES’ SECRET TRAGEDY Ashes hero Ben Stokes’ brother and sister were killed by his mum’s jealous ex, three years before England star’s birth.Read the rest of this entry »





Round up of the Media Law Cases in the 2018-2019 legal year: Six libel and privacy trials – Nataly Tedone

11 09 2019

The legal year in England and Wales ended on 31 July 2019.  The High Court, the Court of Appeal and the Supreme Court are now on vacation until Michaelmas Term begins on 1 October 2019. Our Table of Media Law cases records 57 judgments in media law cases this legal year. Read the rest of this entry »





Bad News: A Psychological ‘vaccine’ against fake news – Sander van der Linden and Jon Rozenbeek

7 09 2019

Journalists, politicians, academics, and governments all agree that the problem of news manipulation needs to be addressed, even if no one seems to be able to agree on what to call it. The terms ‘fake news’, ‘misinformation’, ‘disinformation’, and ‘propaganda’ are all used interchangeably. Read the rest of this entry »





Law and Media Summer Round Up – 4 September 2019

4 09 2019

The Media and Communications List has become a Specialist List, with the significant implementation of Civil Procedure Rule 53 along with a new Practice Direction and Pre-Action Protocol. Read the rest of this entry »





Critics of South Africa’s judges are raising the temperature: legitimate, or dangerous? – Hugh Corder

31 08 2019

The South African judiciary is once more centre stage in the political drama unfolding around the battle for supremacy within the governing African National Congress (“ANC”). Read the rest of this entry »





New rules for media and communications claims – Iain Wilson and Elisabeth Mason

22 08 2019

From 1 October 2019 new rules – in the form of a revised Part 53, Media and Communication Claims, revised/new practice directions (PD 7A, 53A and 53B) and an all encompassing Pre-action Protocol – will apply to claims in England and Wales arising from media and communications disputes. Read the rest of this entry »





Reporting Family Courts: An example of why headlines matter – Lucy Reed

20 08 2019

We have seen a number of reports dealing with the sad story of a young father called Christopher Brown who took his own life by hanging. The reports follow a Coroner’s Inquest into the death and most have similar copy which suggest they are based upon a single syndicated news report. Read the rest of this entry »





The Telegraph’s Brexit poll is bogus, but broadcasters seem not to have noticed – Steve Barnett

15 08 2019

Opinion polls exude an aura of scientific truth. Those numbers and percentages are so reassuringly solid, especially when generated by one of the well-known names of the polling world, that for many people they represent hard evidence of the state of British public opinion. Read the rest of this entry »