Case Law: Cairns v Modi – Defendant found liable for Twitter comments – Gervase de Wilde

28 03 2012

Chris Cairns’ claim against Lalit Modi has been one of the most high profile libel cases of the past 12 months. The public roles of both parties, the nature of the allegations, the events in question taking place in the context of a controversial offshoot of a popular international sport, the defamatory comments being made on the relatively new medium of Twitter – all this played a part in ensuring that the spotlight was on the litigation throughout. The claim and its defence, however, turned on a single question: was the Claimant a cheat? Read the rest of this entry »





Opinion: Let’s get over this terror of the word ‘statutory’ – Brian Cathcart

28 03 2012

So you’re in favour of the government taking control of newspapers, then?’ Thus Jeremy Paxman to Hugh Grant on Newsnight. And a moment later: ‘But you do want statutory regulation?’ And then again ‘So you would regulate newspapers?’  It is a time-honoured Paxman technique, and no one would argue with his right to employ it. Nor did Grant find it especially difficult to deal with, explaining calmly that there were all sorts of viable options between the two extremes of full-on state regulation and free-for-all. Read the rest of this entry »