Case Law: Tesla Motors v BBC, Libel and Malicious falsehood – Edward Craven

16 03 2012

The BBC’s Top Gear is no stranger to controversy. Renowned for its irreverent brand of humour, comments on the show have landed the BBC in hot water on more than one occasion. But while they often occupy the headlines, such incidents have rarely ended up before the courts. The recent Tesla v BBC case ([2012] EWHC 310 (QB)) is a notable exception. Read the rest of this entry »





Media, policing and politics: the business of “holding others to account”, Part 3 – Colin Sumner

16 03 2012

Once a rough trade in self-serving but criminogenic information was elevated to the more noble, although self-appointed, task of ‘holding people to account’ in ‘the news of the screws’ and the media more generally, it was inevitable that political careers, and lives generally, would be destroyed by a barely regulated industry of censure and slur. In turn, that meant that powerful and very public people would become more professional in protecting their power, image, position and livelihoods. It led to an outbreak of libel suits just as night follows day. Read the rest of this entry »