Opinion: “A decade later: time to revisit Lord Woolf’s approach to privacy in A v B? Part 1” Niri Shan and Adam Rendle

27 05 2011

Mark Thomson has accused the media of self-interest in their reporting of the mis-named “super-injunctions ” scandal. This criticism is an easy one to make but, putting aside the potential conflict of interest, the media are right to object to the courts’ current approach to privacy cases, even if not for all of the reasons on which they rely. Important issues are raised by the apparent willingness of courts to accept that reasonable expectations of privacy exist and that they outweigh freedom of expression, which we explore in this two-part series. Read the rest of this entry »





“Super-injunctions”, Twitter and Gagging the Press – Mark Thomson

27 05 2011

The smoke is beginning to clear over the “super-injunctions” battlefield. The mainstream media has taken part in – some would say orchestrated – a successful campaign of civil disobedience. Multiple and blatant breaches of the law appear to have gone unpunished. The forces of the evil gaggers have been vanquished with the indispensable assistance of Twitter and John Hemming MP. Twitter usage figures have soared and, presumably, at least a few readers have been buying papers to find out the latest twist and turn of “gag-gate”.
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